VLADIMIR PUTIN bombs Islamic terrorists in Syria while Barack Hussein Obama pulls America’s last aircraft carrier out of the Persian Gulf

As Russian warships rain down cruise missiles as part of its military strike in Syria, there’s now a glaring absence in the region: For the first time since 2007, the U.S. Navy has no aircraft carrier in the Persian Gulf.

The USS Theodore Roosevelt — a massive, nuclear-powered aircraft carrier — has had a central role in the fight against ISIS in Iraq and Syria since August 2014, when the U.S.-led coalition started bombing the Islamist extremists.

NBC News  Military officials said Thursday that they’ve pulled the USS Theodore Roosevelt, which is home to about 5,000 service members and 65 combat planes, so that it can undergo ‘maintenance.’ (Yeah, sure) The ship officially exited the gulf around 11 p.m. ET.

The lack of a U.S. presence in the gulf comes as Russia is escalating its actions in the region and began pounding targets in Syria last week with airstrikes. Russian officials say they’re trying to obliterate ISIS, although the U.S. and its allies say they’re instead hitting rebel fighters who oppose Syrian President Bashar Assad, a Russian ally. (Yes, that too)

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Russia remains a wild card in the region — and the absence of an American aircraft carrier is being noticed, said Peter Daly, a retired Navy vice admiral and CEO of the U.S. Naval Institute. “The most important thing you need a carrier for is for what you don’t know is going to happen next,” Daly told NBC News.

That was especially important during the height of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, when the Navy often had two carriers operating in the region. The combat planes can fly into war zones and generally act as a show of force to Iran and other nations during tense standoffs.

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The USS Theodore Roosevelt — a massive, nuclear-powered aircraft carrier — has had a central role in the fight against ISIS in Iraq and Syria since August 2014, when the U.S.-led coalition started bombing the Islamist extremists.

A Navy official told Washington lawmakers in July that the lack of a carrier was imminent — and could potentially hamstring operations. “Without that carrier, there will be a detriment to our capability there,” Adm. John Richardson said during a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing, prior to his confirmation in the Navy’s top post.

Russian Air Force destroys 29 ISIS camps in Syria in 24 hours 

Russian warplanes in Syria have bombed 29 terrorist field camps and other facilities of the militant group Islamic State in the past 24 hours, the Russian Defense Ministry reported.

Our aviation group over the past day has destroyed two militant command centers, 29 field camps, 23 fortified facilities and several troop positions with military hardware,” ministry spokesman Maj. Gen. Igor Konashenkov said Saturday.

The Russian Air Force conducted 64 sorties and hit a total of 55 targets, he said.

He added that the Russian effort has “considerably degraded” the strength of the terrorist forces in Syria.

During the initial phase of the operation, our warplanes have destroyed the biggest and most important supply hubs of ISIL,” Konashenkov said, calling Islamic State by its former name. This resulted in the “mobility and offensive capability” of the jihadists being reduced, he said.

The general said signal intelligence reports indicate that the militants are suffering from a shortage of fuel and ammunition after the Russian bombings. “Some of them are demoralized and are actively leaving the battle zone, moving in eastern and northeastern directions,” he said.

Konashenkov said that the increasing number of combat missions conducted by Russia in Syria is explained by the large number of potential targets identified and confirmed as viable by space and aerial reconnaissance.

Russia started its bombing campaign in Syria last week with a goal to provide air support to the government troops fighting against various terrorist groups, primarily Islamic State. This allowed Damascus to go on the offensive in Hama province on Friday.

Russia has also reported killing 2 ISIS commanders, and three hundred militants.

 

Airstrikes Hit ISIL Terrorists in Syria, Iraq > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Been a While!

Airstrikes Hit ISIL in Syria, Iraq > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE. More Dead Muslims!

SOUTHWEST ASIA, October 6, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Bomber, fighter, and remotely piloted aircraft conducted seven strikes in Syria:

— Near Hasakah, five strikes struck four separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL vehicle-borne improvised explosive device, five ISIL buildings, and an ISIL checkpoint.

Near Dayr Az Zawr, one strike struck an ISIL crude oil collection point.

Near Manbij, one strike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL building.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Bomber, fighter, attack, fighter-attack, ground-attack, and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 17 strikes in Iraq, coordinated with and in support of the government of Iraq:

— Near Huwayjah, three strikes struck two separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed three ISIL fighting positions and suppressed an ISIL mortar position.

— Near Habbaniyah, one strike destroyed an ISIL weapons cache.

— Near Mosul, One ISIL fighter Rear Mounted to a Donkey was destroyed.

— Near Mosul, one strike destroyed an ISIL tactical vehicle.

— Near Ramadi, nine strikes struck six separate ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL vehicle-borne bomb, four ISIL buildings, ten ISIL fighting positions, an ISIL heavy machine gun, an ISIL excavator, two ISIL mortar positions, an ISIL improvised explosive device compound, three ISIL homemade explosive facilities, an ISIL house bomb, an ISIL homemade explosive cache, and denied ISIL access to terrain.

— Near Sinjar, two strikes destroyed six ISIL bunkers.

— Near Sultan Abdallah, one strike suppressed an ISIL mortar position.

France launches first airstrikes against ISIS in Syria – CNN.com

(CNN)The French military has carried out its first airstrikes against ISIS in Syria, according to a statement from the office of France’s presidency.

The country had announced earlier this month that it would expand its aerial campaign against ISIS in Iraq — which it began a year ago — to include the militant group’s positions in Syria.

The French president’s office said that the strikes in Syria, which began Sunday, were based on intelligence gathered from air surveillance operations conducted over Syria during the past two weeks.

“Our country confirms its firm commitment to the fight against the terrorist threat Daesh,” the statement said, using the Arabic acronym for ISIS. “We will strike whenever our national security is at stake.”

President Francois Hollande, speaking on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly in New York, described the camp as a “threat to our country.”

“We reached our goal and the whole training camp was destroyed,” Hollande said.

Six aircraft were used in the mission, which was led by the French but closely coordinated with the U.S.-led coalition, he said.

Despite the “horrible acts” committed by ISIS, Hollande placed the blame for the Syrian crisis on the country’s long time strongman Bashar al-Assad.

“Bashar al Assad is the main person at fault, although Daesh commits horrible acts,” Hollande said. “The future of Syria cannot happen with Bashar al Assad.”

String of terrorist attacks

France has been the site of a number of terrorist attacks this year.

Islamic extremists killed 17 people in a quick succession of attacks in Paris in January, including the shooting deaths of staff members in the offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

In June, authorities said a man in southeastern France decapitated his boss, displayed the severed head with Islamist banners and also set off an explosion in a factory. And last month, three American men brought down a suspected terrorist gunman who tried to open fire on a train bound for France.

But France has also linked the refugee crisis Europe is facing in part to ISIS, saying it would strike the group for driving thousands of civilians out of Syria. “We’re not going to receive 4 to 5 million Syrians, so the problem has to be dealt with at source,” French Prime Minister Manuel Valls told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour.

France has been in talks with Russia about a political solution in Syria.

“Russia supports the regime of Bashar (al) Assad. But it also wants to find a political solution. And anyway, there will not be any political solution without a dialogue with all of the parties who directly or indirectly are involved with Syria,” Valls said.

France also planned to hold talks about Syria with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.

 

Report: A former physics teacher is now leading ISIS 

A former physics teacher from Mosul has been installed as a new temporary leader for the Islamic State after the terror group’s leader was reportedly injured in an airstrike in March, an Iraqi government adviser told Newsweek.

Newsweek describes Abu Alaa Afri as a “rising star” within Islamic State (also known as ISIS, ISIL, and Daesh), and the Iraqi government adviser, Hisham al Hashimi, said Afri had become even more important than the injured “caliph” of ISIS, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

“More important, and smarter, and with better relationships. He is a good public speaker and strong charisma,” Hashimi told Newsweek. “All the leaders of Daesh find that he has much jihadi wisdom, and good capability at leadership and administration.”

Afri will become ISIS’ new permanent leader if Baghdadi dies, Hashimi said. He is reportedly a follower of Abu Musaab al-Suri, a prominent jihadi scholar, and used to teach physics in the northwestern Iraqi city of Tal Afar.

Having a caliph with a background of religious education is important to ISIS, which has shaped its self-proclaimed caliphate around a strict interpretation of sharia law. The group recruits people to come live in its territory by marketing it as an Islamic utopia.

Der Spiegel reported recently that early leaders of ISIS, many of whom are former Iraqi intelligence officers from ousted dictator Saddam Hussein’s regime, decided to make Baghdadi caliph because he, as an “educated cleric,” would “give the group a religious face.”

Afri reportedly became Baghdadi’s right-hand man after Baghdadi took a step back from decision-making for security reasons, Newsweek reports. He has served as a link between ISIS’ top leaders and its lower ranks and helps with coordination between the upper ranks and the emirs in different regional provinces.

Osama bin Laden reportedly tapped Afri to run Al Qaeda in Iraq, ISIS’ predecessor, after the death of senior officials in 2010, according to Newsweek. Afri became a senior member of the group and was known to be “very strict,” Hashimi said.

Newsweek reports that Afri is thought to desire reconciliation with Al Qaeda and its affiliate Jabhat al-Nusra, also known as Nusra Front, a chief rival of ISIS in Syria.

ISIS used to be aligned with Al Qaeda, but Al Qaeda leadership denounced ISIS after the group defied its directives and continued releasing brutal propaganda. The two terror groups have been competing for territory in Syria since then, and Western airstrikes targeting ISIS in Syria have hurt that group while allowing Nusra to rise, the Associated Press reported last month.

ISIS Control Pentagon MapUS Department of Defense

And Nusra has faced pressure from its members to reconcile with ISIS so the two groups can join together to fight a common enemy: the West.

The Pentagon reported earlier this month that ISIS had since August lost thousands of miles of territory it once controlled, though nearly all of that lost territory is in Iraq, not Syria.

Afri also reportedly wants ISIS leadership to be made up half of Arabs and half of foreign fighters, which is a departure from its current structure.

The Washington Post reported earlier this month that nearly all of ISIS’ leaders were former Iraqi officers, not foreign fighters. The foreign fighters have proved valuable for ISIS’ media strategy — the group used the now-infamous “Jihadi John,” a British extremist, in some of its beheading videos to gain more attention from the West — but seem to have so far been kept out of the upper echelons of leadership.

ISIS’ leaders operate largely in the shadows. Since rising to power as the leader of ISIS, Baghdadi has rarely appeared on video, and few photos of him have been released.

The Pentagon has denied reports of Baghdadi’s injury. US defense officials told The Daily Beast that the airstrike that reportedly wounded him was not aimed at a high-value target and that they “have no reason to believe it was Baghdadi.”

Martin Chulov at The Guardian reported that the strike targeted multiple cars in the town of Baaj in northwestern Iraq and that officials didn’t know that Baghdadi was in one of the cars.

Syrian regime air strikes kill 38 IS fighters: monitor – 8 Hours Ago

Beirut (AFP) – At least 38 Islamic State group fighters were killed in airstrikes by the Damascus regime against three jihadist-held towns in central Syria, a monitoring group said on Tuesday.

Monday’s strikes hit Palmyra and two other towns in Homs province, Syrian Observatory for Human Rights director Rami Abdel Rahman told AFP.

The Syrian air force has been increasing its strikes against IS in recent days as it received reinforcements from Russia, he said.

“The number of raids is growing and the strikes are more precise after the Syrian air force received arms and more efficient planes from Moscow,” said Abdel Rahman, whose group relies on broad network of civilian, military and medical sources inside Syria.

Experts close to the regime have told AFP that Russia has sent advisers to train Syrian troops in the new weapons, in particular short-range air defence systems and tanks.

US military officials told AFP on Monday that Russia had deployed 28 combat planes in Syria, in the latest move in Moscow’s increasing military presence in the war-torn country.

Washington in recent weeks has expressed growing concern over Russia’s moves to support Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and warned that military backing for his regime risks further hampering efforts at bringing peace.

Moscow has been on a diplomatic push to get the coalition of Western and regional powers fighting IS in Syria to join forces with Assad against the jihadists.

Saudi-Led Coalition Ramps Up Airstrikes Against Rebels in Yemen 

SAN’A, Yemen—A Saudi-led military coalition escalated airstrikes targeting Houthi rebels in neighboring Yemen over the weekend, as its ground troops prepare for an anticipated offensive toward the capital, San’a.

Eight strikes hit a school Sunday in San’a that is connected to former president Ali Abdullah Saleh, local security officials said. Other strikes Sunday caused dozens of casualties in the southern city of Ibb and in the northern Sa’ada province, officials in those places said.

The weekend’s strikes included one that hit San’a’s Old City, a UNESCO-designated heritage site. At least 31 people were killed and 120 wounded in that attack and others in San’a late Friday night, according to Tamim al-Shami, a spokesman for the Houthi-controlled health ministry.

The Saudi coalition, which consists mainly of Sunni Muslim-majority Persian Gulf states, has been trying since March to oust the Houthis, a rebel militant group that is part of the Zaidi offshoot of Shiite Islam.

Saudi Arabia and its backers, which include the U.S., see the Houthis as an illegitimate movement supported by Shiite Iran. They want to restore power to Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi, the exiled Yemeni president, in what has increasingly come to be seen as a proxy conflict between Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Airstrikes Continue Against ISIL in Iraq, Syria: Warning Graphic Image.

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SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 16, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Fighter-attack and remotely piloted aircraft conducted three airstrikes in Syria:

— Near Mar’a, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

— Near Abu Kamal, two airstrikes struck two ISIL oil field wellheads.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, bomber, fighter, fighter-attack and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 11 airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the government of Iraq:

— Near Baghdadi, an airstrike destroyed three ISIL rocket rails.

— Near Beiji, two airstrikes struck one large and one small ISIL tactical units, and destroyed three ISIL vehicles.

— Near Fallujah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed three ISIL rockets.

— Near Hit, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

— Near Kirkuk, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL fighting position.

— Near Mosul, an airstrike destroyed ISIL fighter rear mounting a donkey. Donkey survived but he is extremely distressed. Pentagon shared photo below.

ISIS Rearmount

— Near Mosul, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL heavy machine gun and 12 ISIL fighting positions.

— Near Sinjar, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL mortar tube and three ISIL fighting positions.

— Near Sultan Abdallah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL fighting position.

Australia getting a piece of the action! Launch Airstrikes in Syria.

The Australian government has confirmed it has launched its first airstrikes inside Syria against targets of the so-called Islamic State (IS).

Australia is part of an international military coalition targeting IS strongholds in Syria and Iraq.

Three air strikes were made on Monday, destroying an IS armoured personnel carrier and a crude oil collection point, the US said in a statement

Australia’s air force has been bombing IS targets in Iraq for about 12 months.

Former Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott last week confirmed the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) would extend its action from Iraq into Syria at the request of the US, as he also announced that Australia would accept 12,000 Syrian refugees from persecuted minorities.

The UK, United Arab Emirates, Canada, and France were some of the other nations who took part in the most recent bombing raids, according to the statement issued by the US Central Command.

Fifteen air strikes were carried out in Iraq, using attack, bomber, fighter, fighter-attack and remotely piloted aircraft, it said.

Australia’s Defence Minister Kevin Andrews said two RAAF hornets identified the personnel carrier, hidden in an IS compound.

“One of the Hornets employed a precision guided weapon to destroy the target,” said Mr Andrews.

“This was done from a distance or height that preserved the safety of the Australian aircraft,” he said.

“We work within very strict rules of engagement, and those rules of engagement are to ensure as far as possible that we don’t have unwanted civilian casualties.”

Airstrikes Hit ISIL in Syria, Iraq > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE. More Dead Muslims!

SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 15, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

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Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Fighter aircraft conducted three airstrikes in Syria:

— Near Hasakah, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL armored personnel carrier.

— Near Dayr Az Zawr, an airstrike struck an ISIL crude oil collection point.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, bomber, fighter, fighter-attack and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 15 airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the Iraqi government:

— Near Baghdadi, an airstrike struck an ISIL large tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL building.

— Near Huwayjah, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed two ISIL tunnels and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Beiji, three airstrikes struck three ISIL tactical units and destroyed eight ISIL buildings, an ISIL roadside bomb and an ISIL carport.

— Near Habbaniyah, an airstrike destroyed three ISIL rocket rails.

— Near Kirkuk, an airstrike struck an ISIL mortar firing position.

— Near Mosul, three airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit, two ISIL rocket firing positions and an ISIL mortar firing position and destroyed three ISIL berms and 14 ISIL fighting positions.

— Near Ramadi, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL house-borne bomb, an ISIL vehicle bomb, five ISIL buildings, an ISIL vehicle and an ISIL motorcycle.

— Near Sinjar, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed six ISIL fighting position, an ISIL heavy machine gun and an ISIL cache. 

Coalition Airstrikes Hit ISIL in Syria, Iraq > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article View

Bad news for ISIL Machinery! Destruction: Excavators, Bulldozers, Motorcycles, Etc etc etc, Pathetic! Here are some multi million dollar stats. But we destroyed 3 ISIL Trenches!!! Im Impressed. Good Job Obama that will show em who’s boss.

dod1

SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 14, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports. 

Airstrikes in Syria

Fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted four airstrikes in Syria:

— Near Dayr Ar Zawr, two airstrikes struck an ISIL crude oil collection point and destroyed an ISIL excavator.

— Near Kobani, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL artillery piece.

— Near Mar’a, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, bomber, fighter, fighter-attack and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 18 airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the Iraqi government:

— Near Huwayjah, an airstrike destroyed three ISIL trenches.

— Near Beiji, four airstrikes struck one large and two small ISIL tactical units and destroyed six ISIL buildings, three ISIL vehicles, an ISIL ant-aircraft artillery piece and an ISIL structure.

— Near Fallujah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL bunker.

— Near Haditha, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL motorcycle.

— Near Kisik, four airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit and an ISIL staging area and destroyed an ISIL excavator and an ISIL fighting position.

— Near Mosul, three airstrikes destroyed two ISIL trenches, an ISIL bulldozer and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Ramadi, two airstrikes destroyed four ISIL weapons caches, an ISIL armored personnel carrier and an ISIL vehicle bomb.

— Near Sultan Abdallah, an airstrike struck an ISIL sniper firing position.

— Near Tuz, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL fighting position.

Syria air strikes not a long term fix

Smoke rises over Syrian town of Kobani after an airstrike, as seen from the Mursitpinar border crossing on the Turkish-Syrian border in the town of Suruc in this file October 18, 2014 file photo.  A U.S.-led military coalition has been bombing Islamic State fighters who hold a large swathe of territory in both Iraq and Syria, two countries involved in complex multi-sided civil wars in which nearly every country in the Middle East has a stake. The Turkish military and police had declared the Turkish-Syrian border area a "military zone", which limits the ability of the press to move around.  In these days of modern warfare, the weaponry is more powerful than that in the old days. So all of my colleagues and I have to be doubly careful to ensure we do not end up in the line of fire, as positions of Kurdish YPG fighters and IS militants change quickly.  For all those reasons, to stay away is the only solution at the moment.  We ended up on hills about 2km (1.24 miles) away from Kobani using very long telephoto lenses, often more than 1000mm, to get a peek into the city while listening to the sound of war and smelling its scent.   Sometimes you see a shadow of a fighter hiding behind a building and more often you see the massive impact of heavy airstrikes.  It is a bit strange sitting there with lenses I usually use for sports photography alongside people from the area, who come to the hills to see what's going on.  They bring binoculars and make tea - making it almost seems like a tourist attraction. - Kai Pfaffenbach       REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach (TURKEY - Tags: MILITARY POLITICS CONFLICT TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY) ATTENTION EDITORS: THIS PICTURE IS PART OF THE PACKAGE 'PICTURES OF THE YEAR 2014 - THE PHOTOGRAPHERS' STORY'. SEARCH 'PHOTOGRAPHERS' STORY' FOR ALL IMAGES' - RTR4FOX1

Dropping bombs on Syria to protect Iraq will not be enough in the long term to help the troubled region, Labor says.

The opposition believes international efforts need to focus on reaching a political solution to ultimately remove the Assad regime in Syria, as well as stepping up humanitarian help in the short term.

The millions of people displaced from Syria need protecting from the Assad government as well as terrorist organisations like Islamic State, Labor’s foreign affairs spokeswoman Tanya Plibersek said.

‘There’s Iran, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, the US and its allies that all need to come to the table as part of developing a solution for Syria,’ she told ABC TV on Sunday.

She also called for Middle Eastern countries, particularly Arab League nations, to do more to help people fleeing Syria.

The federal government says years-long talks about the political situation in Syria are continuing but the immediate focus has to be on stopping terrorist organisation Islamic State.

A report in The Australian newspaper last week said Prime Minister Tony Abbott and Foreign Minister Julie Bishop had developed a strategy to remove Assad, which they will discuss with their US counterparts during a UN summit in three weeks.

‘There is still a significant question mark over the Assad regime and what happens there,’ Immigration Minister Peter Dutton told Sky News on Sunday.

‘Everybody I have spoken to wants to see political stability, reconstruction take place, so that people can return to their country of origin.’

While he respected the views of people who attended rallies on Saturday opposing the air strikes on Syria, he vehemently disagreed with them.

He said the reach of IS was growing and advice the government’s national security committee had was that people involved in it were all significant threats to Australia.

Airstrikes Continue Against ISIL in Iraq, Syria > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article View

More Dead Muslims in the news! Destruction of ISIS seems to be going at snail’s pace?

dod

SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 10, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Attack, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 10 airstrikes in Syria:

— Abu Kamal, an airstrike struck an ISIL crude oil collection point.

— Near Hasakah, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed three ISIL fighting positions, two ISIL motorcycles and an ISIL structure.

— Near Hawl, an airstrike had inconclusive results.

— Near Raqqah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

— Near Kobani, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed three ISIL excavators.

— Near Mar’a, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL mortar supply point and an ISIL mortar tube.

— Near Palmyra, an airstrike had inconclusive results.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, fighter, fighter-attack and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 18 airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the government of Iraq:

— Al Baghdadi, one airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL building.

— Near Beiji, two airstrikes destroyed an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Habbaniyah, one airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two buildings.

— Near Kisik, one airstrike struck an ISIL mortar firing position.

— Near Mosul, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit and an ISIL mortar firing position and destroyed an ISIL fighting position.

— Near Ramadi, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL building.

— Near Rawah, one airstrike struck an ISIL large tactical unit and an ISIL encampment.

— Near Sinjar, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and an ISIL mortar firing position and destroyed three ISIL fighting positions and two ISIL light machine guns.

— Near Tal Afar, an airstrike struck an ISIL mortar firing position.

— Near Tuz, four airstrikes destroyed 13 ISIL fighting positions and two ISIL vehicles.

Hopefully we do better than this soon. This “War” is never going to end. Look at the cost, than look at what the accomplish each day, I am confused?

Military Airstrikes Continue Against ISIL in Syria, Iraq > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article View

End the day with a good note, More dead Muslims.

dod1

SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 6, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, which took place between 8 a.m. yesterday and 8 a.m. today, local time, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted eight airstrikes in Syria:

— Near Raqqah, an airstrike had inconclusive results.

— Near Mar’a, six airstrikes struck five ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL mortar tube, an ISIL vehicle and an ISIL weapons cache.

— Near Tal Abyad, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL fighting positions.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Bomber, fighter, fighter-attack and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 25 airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the Iraqi government:

— Near Huwayjah, an airstrike had inconclusive results.

— Near Beiji, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL artillery piece, an ISIL building, an ISIL tunnel entrance and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Habbaniyah, an airstrike struck an ISIL sniper firing position and destroyed an ISIL building.

— Near Haditha, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Hit, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

— Near Kisik, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and an ISIL heavy machine gun firing position and destroyed an ISIL fighting position, an ISIL light machine gun and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Mosul, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL fighting position, an ISIL armored vehicle and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Ramadi, seven airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units, five ISIL staging areas and destroyed an ISIL motorcycle, an ISIL building and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Rawah, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL homemade explosives facility.

— Near Sinjar, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL fighting positions.

— Near Sultan Abdallah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL fighting position.

— Near Tuz, two airstrikes destroyed 48 ISIL fighting positions and two ISIL vehicles.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 6, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, which took place between 8 a.m. yesterday and 8 a.m. today, local time, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted eight airstrikes in Syria:

— Near Raqqah, an airstrike had inconclusive results.

— Near Mar’a, six airstrikes struck five ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL mortar tube, an ISIL vehicle and an ISIL weapons cache.

— Near Tal Abyad, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL fighting positions.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Bomber, fighter, fighter-attack and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 25 airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the Iraqi government:

— Near Huwayjah, an airstrike had inconclusive results.

— Near Beiji, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL artillery piece, an ISIL building, an ISIL tunnel entrance and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Habbaniyah, an airstrike struck an ISIL sniper firing position and destroyed an ISIL building.

— Near Haditha, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Hit, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

— Near Kisik, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and an ISIL heavy machine gun firing position and destroyed an ISIL fighting position, an ISIL light machine gun and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Mosul, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL fighting position, an ISIL armored vehicle and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Ramadi, seven airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units, five ISIL staging areas and destroyed an ISIL motorcycle, an ISIL building and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Rawah, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL homemade explosives facility.

— Near Sinjar, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL fighting positions.

— Near Sultan Abdallah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL fighting position.

— Near Tuz, two airstrikes destroyed 48 ISIL fighting positions and two ISIL vehicles.

Part of Operation Inherent Resolve

Russian jets in Syrian skies – 

Looks like the war is about to begin! It will be interesting to see Russia’s approach to defeating ISIS, also how much of a Military force they will end up using in order to not lose face. I think we are all in for a surprise! Russia has been itching to flex some Military Muscle. I think they are going to shred the region.

Russian fighter pilots are expected to begin arriving in Syria in the coming days, and will fly their Russian air force fighter jets and attack helicopters against ISIS and rebel-aligned targets within the failing state.

 

According to Western diplomats, a Russian expeditionary force has already arrived in Syria and set up camp in an Assad-controlled air base. The base is said to be in area surrounding Damascus, and will serve, for all intents and purposes, as a Russian forward operating base.

 

In the coming weeks thousands of Russian military personnel are set to touch down in Syria, including advisors, instructors, logistics personnel, technical personnel, members of the aerial protection division, and the pilots who will operate the aircraft.

A formation of Russian Mig 31's (Photo: Reuters)
A formation of Russian Mig 31’s (Photo: Reuters)

Past reports have stated that the Russians were in talks to sell the Syrians a package of MiG-29 fighter jets, and Yak-130 trainer jets (which can also serve as attack aircraft.) The current makeup of the expeditionary force is still unknown, but there is no doubt that Russian pilots flying combat missions in Syrian skies will definitely change the existing dynamics in the Middle East.

 

The Russians do not harbor offensive intentions towards Israel or other sovereign states in the area, and their main stated goal is battling ISIS and preserving Assad’s rule. However, their presence will represent a challenge to the Israeli Air Force’s freedom of operation in the skies above the Middle East.

 

Western diplomatic sources recently reported that a series of negotiations had been held between the Russians and the Iranians, mainly focusing on ISIS and the threat it poses to the Assad regime. The infamous Iranian Quds Force commander Major General Qasem Soleimani recently visited Moscow in the framework of these talks. As a result the Russians and the Iranians reached a strategic decision: Make any effort necessary to preserve Assad’s seat of power, so that Syria may act as a barrier, and prevent the spread of ISIS and Islamist backed militias into the former Soviet Islamic republics.

 

Russian Air force air craft (Photo: Reuters)
Russian Air force air craft (Photo: Reuters)

 

The Russians are not the only ones coordinating their Middle East policy with the Iranians; The US has also jumped aboard that train. American government officials have been holding intensive consultations with representatives of the Iranian regime concerning a stronger joint effort against ISIS in Iraq. It seems that the US government currently views Iran as a central and necessary force in the campaign against ISIS within Iraq.

 

The Iranian-American cooperation is focused on two focal points: The first being Anbar province, where the Iraqis have thus far failed to expel ISIS; and the second Mosul, where the Iraqis have yet to come up with a feasible plan to recapture the city.

 

Western diplomatic sources have emphasized that the Obama administration is fully aware of the Russian intent to intervene directly in Syria, but has yet to issue any reaction. The absence of a vocal opposition from the Obama administration is compounded by its cessation of calls for the dissolution of Assad’s murderous regime.

 

This and more: The Iranians and the Russians- with the US well aware- have begun the struggle to reequip the Syrian army, which has been left in tatters by the civil war. They intend not only to train Assad’s army, but to also equip it. During the entire duration of the civil war, the Russians have consistently sent a weapons supply ship to the Russian held port of Tartus in Syria on a weekly basis. The ships would bring missiles, replacement parts, and different types of ammunition for the Syrian army.

 

A Russian Air Force Mig 31 (Photo: Reuters)
A Russian Air Force Mig 31 (Photo: Reuters)

 

Arab media outlets have recently published reports that Syria and Russia were looking for an additional port on the Syrian coast, which will serve the Russians in their mission to hasten the pace of the Syrian rearmament.

 

In the meantime, Assad’s army is in full scale retreat in the strategic province of Idlib. Mere days ago, a force from the Jaesh Al Fatah (A coalition or rebel groups including Jabhat al-Nusra) advanced on the Abu Duhur military airfield in southwestern Syria’s Iblib province, which borders on Latika. Alwaite and Christian residents of the area have fled to the last remaining Alawite Bantustans along the country’s coastline.

 

Even Turkey, which has so far avoided any action which would strengthen Assad, has had to come to terms with the Russian-Iranian move and the resulting American silence, leading it to launch its own bombing campaign against ISIS in Syria.

 

During a recent trip to Qatar, Erdogan reached understandings with the Qataris and the Saudis regarding a program to arm Muslim Brotherhood backed rebels who are fighting against ISIS, de-facto fighting both Assad and ISIS.

Airstrikes Hit ISIL Terrorists in Syria, Iraq > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article View

And even more property damage? Seems like we are missing the large tactical units we use to target.

dod1

SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 4, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Attack, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted six airstrikes in Syria:

— Near Hasakah, two airstrikes destroyed two ISIL excavators.

— Near Raqqah, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL vehicles.

— Near Mar’a, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL staging area.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, bomber, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 15 airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the government of Iraq:

Near Baghdadi, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL rocket firing position.

— Near Beiji, three airstrikes struck three ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL building, an ISIL mortar system and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Habbaniyah, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Haditha, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed two ISIL buildings and an ISIL excavator.

— Near Hit, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

— Near Kirkuk, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

— Near Kisik, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL anti-aircraft artillery piece and an ISIL fighting position.

— Near Mosul, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL fighting position and an ISIL heavy machine gun.

— Near Ramadi, an airstrike struck an ISIL large tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL vehicles.

— Near Sinjar, two airstrikes struck an ISIL mortar firing position and an ISIL rocket firing position and destroyed two ISIL fighting positions and an ISIL command and control facility.

— Near Tuz, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed 10 ISIL rockets and an ISIL vehicle.

Coalition Airstrikes Continue Against ISIL in Syria, Iraq > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article View

Did some property damage.

dod1

SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 3, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Attack, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted seven airstrikes in Syria:

— Near Hawl, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL bunker.

— Near Raqqah, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units.

— Near Dayr Az Zawr, an airstrike struck an ISIL bridge.

— Near Kobani, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed two ISIL bunker entrances.

— Near Mar’a, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL staging area and an ISIL vehicle.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, bomber, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 17 airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the Iraqi government:

— Near Huwayjah, an airstrike struck an ISIL light machine gun firing position.

— Near Beiji, two airstrikes destroyed two ISIL excavators.

— Near Fallujah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Habbaniyah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL boat and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Haditha, an airstrike destroyed three ISIL vehicle bombs and an ISIL excavator.

— Near Kirkuk, an airstrike destroyed two ISIL fighting positions and two ISIL mortar tubes.

— Near Kisik, an airstrike destroyed two ISIL bunkers.

— Near Kisik, an airstrike captured video of large group of ISIL rear mounting their Donkeys.

— Near Mosul, four airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and an ISIL observation tower and destroyed two ISIL checkpoints, two ISIL fighting positions, an ISIL excavator and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Ramadi, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL buildings and an ISIL tank.

— Near Sinjar, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed three ISIL fighting positions, an ISIL artillery piece, an ISIL light machine gun and an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Tuz, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

Military Airstrikes Hit ISIL Terrorists in Syria, Iraq > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article View

Pretty Pathetic Day!

dod

SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 2, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Attack, bomber, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted five airstrikes in Syria:

— Drone Attack, Killed one ISIS fighter Rear Docking His Donkey.

Near Hawl, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL front end loader.

Near Raqqah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL bunker.

Near Mar’a, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed two ISIL buildings, an ISIL excavator, an ISIL fighting position and an ISIL mortar system.

Near Washiyah, one airstrike struck an ISIL artillery piece.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted eight airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the government of Iraq:

Near Qaim, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

Near Beiji, an airstrike struck an ISIL large tactical unit and destroyed four ISIL vehicles and an ISIL homemade explosives facility.

Near Haditha, an airstrike destroyed two ISIL vehicles and an ISIL vehicle-borne bomb.

Near Mosul, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed two ISIL fighting positions and an ISIL heavy machine gun.

Near Qayyrah, an airstrike struck an ISIL staging area.

Near Sinjar, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed four ISIL fighting positions, an ISIL heavy machine gun and an ISIL light machine gun.

Near Tal Afar, one airstrike struck an ISIL mortar firing position.

Obama’s battle against ISIS is failing By Danielle Pletka Updated 12:26 PM ET, Wed September 2, 2015

Smoke rises above a damaged building following a U.S.-led coalition airstrike against ISIS positions during a military operation to regain control of the eastern suburbs of Ramadi, Iraq, on Saturday, August 15.

Smoke rises over Ramadi after coalition airstrikes fail to uproot ISIS insurgents.

In light of the spiraling disasters throughout the Middle East and North Africa, no one-size-fits-all approach can work against ISIS.

(CNN)It’s been a year since Steven Sotloff was brutally murdered. The images, which have become all too commonplace, shocked the American public — and consequently, the American President — into responding to the horror that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria has wrought in the Middle East. But countless decapitations, and hundreds of thousands of less infamous (but no less vile) predations later, ISIS continues to flourish.

The United States has no strategy against the terrorist group, and the tactics being pursued by the Obama administration are failing.

In early July, the President took to the airwaves to announce that things were going, well, OK, in the battle against ISIS. “As with any military effort, there will be periods of progress,” he began hopefully, “but there are also going to be some setbacks — as we’ve seen with ISIL’s gains in Ramadi in Iraq and central and southern Syria.”

Danielle Pletka

Yes, Mr. Obama there have been setbacks. And those are not the worst of them.

Why ISIS wants to erase Palmyra's history

Why ISIS wants to erase Palmyra’s history

ISIS, also known as the Islamic State, the Islamic State of Syria and the Levant and as Daesh, a variant of the Arabic acronym for ISIS, has taken Mosul and Ramadi in Iraq, has taken Palmyra in southern Syria and is spreading through Yemen, Libya, Egypt, Afghanistan, Algeria and beyond.

Obama administration officials insist that ISIS is not 10 feet tall and has its own troubles. Senior leaders have been picked off by drones, and the group is at daggers drawn with al Qaeda. All true. But ISIS continues to attract foreign fighters, and intelligence officials admit that despite upwards of 10,000 deaths, the group’s strength is estimated at 20,000 to 30,000, virtually unchanged from when the United States began more intensive operations in 2013.

Retired Gen. John Allen, the Obama administration’s special envoy, insists that ISIS is losing. In an existential sense, he’s right. ISIS isn’t going to run Iraq or Yemen or Syria anytime soon. But it is running statelets in Iraq and Syria and is putting in place the accouterments of the state it claims to be.

Worse yet, what the administration claims to be good news — the intensified engagement of Saudi Arabia and Turkey in the fight — is far from uniformly positive. Both Riyadh and Ankara have been supporting groups that include al Qaeda affiliate Jabhat al Nusra. And the Turks, who have finally woken up to the danger to their own security from ISIS, are more interested in using the new U.S.-Turkish partnership to attack Kurdish groups gaining ground in Syria. In other words, in subcontracting national security policy to others, we have found — surprise — that they do not share our views about the enemy.

In Iraq, ISIS continues to hold substantial and important territory, and notwithstanding efforts by the al-Abadi government in Baghdad, insufficient progress has been made in reconciling the Sunni and Shia factions whose fighting has allowed ISIS to flourish.

Nor, notwithstanding the bizarre partnership between the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Obama White House in Iraq, have Shiite militias “advised” by Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps and occasionally backed by U.S. air power been able to beat back ISIS in a meaningful way.

In Yemen, the story is much the same.

The country’s slow-motion collapse, while less in the headlines than Syria, has pitted the Saudis and their proxies against Iran and its proxies, with the most notable result being benefits for al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and ISIS’ Yemen branch.

Libya, too, is divided between the genuine and more moderate government now holed up in Tobruk, an Islamist government in Tripoli and ISIS and other al Qaeda-related groups growing steadily in the void.

In light of the spiraling disasters throughout the Middle East and North Africa, no one-size-fits-all approach can work. Clearly, intensified effort is needed to help the Iraqi military and to reengage Iraq’s Sunni — likely more military assistance, more aid and deeper engagement by the United States. In Syria, the training that has generated just 60 U.S.-taught members of the Free Syrian Army must ramp up dramatically.

But that’s far from enough; fashioning a transitional government acceptable to the United States and the Syrian people should have already begun. Indeed, each country demands its own separate strategy, but there is one common element: Washington cannot drop in when bad news hits the front pages, as it did when Steven Sotloff, James Foley and Peter Kassig met their grisly ends.

It is tempting to believe that the countries of the region can rise to meet their own challenges, but there is not a scintilla of evidence to support the notion. And while some continue to insist that the nightmare that has driven 11 million people from their homes is somehow not America’s problem, the reality of ISIS’ (and al Qaeda’s) growth and spread and continued strength means that these terrorists will be on our doorstep sooner rather than later.