Who would win in a war between Russia and the U.S.?

And there shall be upon every high mountain, and upon every high hill, rivers and streams of waters in the day of the great slaughter, when the towers fall. “Quotation from Revelations”

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Towers have been falling, Russia warns U.S.A. Israel to be Split, Iran deal, Britton that was Great is bowing down. All Nations are in conflict. Ha! Listen to me, I’m not even a Religious Zealot.  Here is what It may look like using modern pictures.

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The Russian nuclear forces are dependent upon her ICBM’s.  Her boomer subs and air force wouldn’t get much launched (her bombers wouldn’t make it to American airspace and her max of two deployed nuke boomers are trailed at all times by at least one American and one other NATO attack sub — they’d never make it to launch depth).  But that doesn’t matter.  Even if only the two modern MIRV equipped ICBMs work (the very advanced, RS-24 Yars; and the reasonably advanced RT-2UTTKh Topol-M), that would be a total of about 125 ICBM’s.  (trust that the aging RT-2pms, UR-100Ns and R-36 still have some bite).

All things considered, that means that the minimal (stress on the “minimal”) strike would look something like this:

  • There are approximately 40-50 RS ICBMs. Each has between 4-8 warheads, with between 100-300kt explosive blast each warhead.  Assume the average — 6 MIRVs at 150kt blast each (7x Nagasaki), would mean 270 strikes.
  • There are approximately 80 RT-2UTTKh ICBMs.  Each has only one warhead, but at a devastating 800kt. (40x Nagasaki), total of 80 strikes.

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The total number of warhead blasts in the US would be no less than 350 nuclear strikes (that’s NO LESS than, but highly likely much higher when older warheads are added in).  Even if only 350 nuclear strikes occurred, and only 100 highly important targets were selected (doubling or trippling up on important locations), easily the top 80 largest cities (every major metro area) + the 20 most important military targets were struck, the US would be wiped off the face of the map.  The entire nation would end.  Most people would be dead in six months due to disease and starvation.   If ONLY the Russians struck (with no retaliation from the US), humanity might survive such an attack.
===Total yield: 3,500 times Nagasaki (this excludes many other older nukes that, if they worked appropriately, would push this number way beyond 10,000 times Nagasaki).

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The American strike would be more thorough both for Russia and possibly for humanity.  The US’s nuclear triad (ICBMs, Air Force and Navy) would have more successful launches due to the larger nature of the American forces and the more modern equipment.   The Ballistic Missile Submarines (boomers) would do the trick, 14 total with nukes, seven deployed at any given time.  They’re beyond deadly.  Their nuclear payloads capable of being launched in under 30 minutes.

  • Each Ohio Class boomer has 24 Trident II SLBM that are MIRV’ed with between 6-8 W76 110kt nuclear warhead (5.5 times Nagasaki).  Even if we went with the average (7 warheads), that’s 1,176 nuclear strikes from the Ohio Class nuclear payload.
  • The US also operates 450 Minuteman III ICBMs that are MIRV’ed with 3 nuclear warheads (in the process if not concluded, the downgrade to 1 MIRV each).  The exact type of warhead is classified, but the warheads are either the W78 or W87, with no less than 300kt of explosive yield (15x Nagasaki).  That’s a total maximum of 1,350 nuclear warheads, minimum of 450.

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The total number of blasts would be insane, no less than 2,526.  We haven’t even counted any Air Force method, presuming that the Russians could/would destroy them in flight.  Nevertheless, even if strikes were doubled and/or tripled up on cities, it would mean that no less than 1,000 locations would be wiped out by more than one (some with three or four) nuclear blasts.  The destruction would be absolute.
===Total yield: no less than 30,000 times Nagasaki

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Russia warns US of ‘unintended incidents’ over Syria. Armageddon has arrived!!! 

The growing rift between the United States and Russia over concerns that Moscow is employing its military to protect Syria’s embattled president appeared to widen Friday when a Russian official called for military cooperation with Washington in order to avoid “unintended incidents.”

The comments were made after Western intelligence sources told Fox News that Russia escalated its presence in the Middle East country days after a secret Moscow meeting in late July between Iran’s Quds Force commander — their chief exporter of terror — and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Officials who have monitored the build-up say they’ve seen more than 1,000 Russian combatants — some of them from the same plainclothes Special Forces units who were sent to Crimea and Ukraine. Some of these Russian troops are logistical specialists and needed for security at the expanding Russian bases.

President Obama warned Russia on Friday against “doubling down” on sending support for Syrian President Bashar Assad, calling the pursuit a “mistake.”

“But we are going to be engaging Russia to let them know that you can’t continue to double-down on a strategy that is doomed to failure,” Obama said at a Maryland event.

Russia denies allegations that it is helping to build Assad’s military. Moscow claimed its increased military presence is part of an international effort to help defeat the Islamic State. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov called on world powers to join Russia in that pursuit, arguing that Syria’s army is the most efficient force to fight extremists in the Middle East.

“You cannot defeat Islamic State with air strikes only,” Lavrov said, a clear dig at the White House’s strategy. “It’s necessary to cooperate with ground troops and the Syrian army is the most efficient and powerful ground force to fight the IS.”

Reuters reported that Russia also called for military-to-military cooperation with the U.S. to avert “unintended incidents.”

Moscow’s recent support of Assad has dampened U.S. hopes that Moscow was tiring of the Syrian president. Syria has been gripped by civil war for more than four years, a conflict that has claimed more than 250,000 lives and created a vacuum for extremism to thrive.

U.S. officials have been gauging Russia’s willingness to help restart a political process to remove Assad from power.

Secretary of State John Kerry has lashed out at Russia’s presence in Syria, warning the recent buildup could lead to an escalation of the bloody conflict.

Despite the warnings from the U.S., Lavrov said Russia would continue to supply Assad with weapons that he said will help defeat Islamic State fighters.

“I can only say, once again, that our servicemen and military experts are there to service Russian military hardware, to assist the Syrian army in using this hardware,” he said at a news conference in Moscow. “And we will continue to supply it to the Syrian government in order to ensure its proper combat readiness in its fight against terrorism.”

Airstrikes Continue Against ISIL in Iraq, Syria > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article View

More Dead Muslims in the news! Destruction of ISIS seems to be going at snail’s pace?

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SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 10, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Attack, fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 10 airstrikes in Syria:

— Abu Kamal, an airstrike struck an ISIL crude oil collection point.

— Near Hasakah, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed three ISIL fighting positions, two ISIL motorcycles and an ISIL structure.

— Near Hawl, an airstrike had inconclusive results.

— Near Raqqah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

— Near Kobani, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed three ISIL excavators.

— Near Mar’a, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL mortar supply point and an ISIL mortar tube.

— Near Palmyra, an airstrike had inconclusive results.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, fighter, fighter-attack and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 18 airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the government of Iraq:

— Al Baghdadi, one airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL building.

— Near Beiji, two airstrikes destroyed an ISIL vehicle.

— Near Habbaniyah, one airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two buildings.

— Near Kisik, one airstrike struck an ISIL mortar firing position.

— Near Mosul, two airstrikes struck an ISIL tactical unit and an ISIL mortar firing position and destroyed an ISIL fighting position.

— Near Ramadi, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed an ISIL building.

— Near Rawah, one airstrike struck an ISIL large tactical unit and an ISIL encampment.

— Near Sinjar, three airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and an ISIL mortar firing position and destroyed three ISIL fighting positions and two ISIL light machine guns.

— Near Tal Afar, an airstrike struck an ISIL mortar firing position.

— Near Tuz, four airstrikes destroyed 13 ISIL fighting positions and two ISIL vehicles.

Hopefully we do better than this soon. This “War” is never going to end. Look at the cost, than look at what the accomplish each day, I am confused?

ISRAEL built a beautiful 9/11 Memorial out of Ground Zero wreckage.

This is the Memorial to 9/11 located in the 9/11 Living Memorial Plaza in Israel.

So why does the the United States continue to Spit in the face of a Country that erects a Monument this beautiful in Memory of us when we suffered? Oh yeah our Muslim President Obama. On top of that we are folding to Iran who have no Monuments for us and millions of Muslims who chant death to America. Have we become a Nation of cowards who are going to allow Islam to force their rule onto us??? Things Look grim for us, and the Monument.

 America has turned its back on this Monument and the people who erected it!

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And have now been sucking the ass of the people pictured below, and their tribute to us?

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Completed in 2009, it sits on 5 acres of hillside, 20 miles from the center of Jerusalem.

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The memorial is a 30 foot bronze American flag…

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…that flows up into the shape of a flame to commemorate the burning Twin Towers.

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The base of the monument is made of melted steel from the wreckage of the World Trade Center.

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And includes this engraving in Hebrew…

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…and in English.

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Surrounding the monument are plaques with the names of every single victim of 9/11.

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It is the only memorial outside the US that includes the names of all who perished in the terrorist attacks…including 5 Israeli citizens.

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The monument is often used for memorial and commemoration services.

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A powerful memorial from a loyal ally of America.

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The site solemnly overlooks Jerusalem’s largest cemetery, Har HaMenuchot.

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Coalition Continues Anti-ISIL Airstrikes in Syria, Iraq > U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE > Article View

dod1SOUTHWEST ASIA, September 7, 2015 — U.S. and coalition military forces have continued to attack Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorists in Syria and Iraq, Combined Joint Task Force Operation Inherent Resolve officials reported today.

Officials reported details of the latest strikes, noting that assessments of results are based on initial reports.

Airstrikes in Syria

Fighter and remotely piloted aircraft conducted four airstrikes in Syria:

— Near Raqqah, an airstrike struck an ISIL staging area.

— Near Mar’a, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

— Near Tamakh, two airstrikes destroyed five ISIL excavators.

Airstrikes in Iraq

Attack, bomber, fighter, fighter-attack and remotely piloted aircraft conducted 11 airstrikes in Iraq, coordinated with the Iraqi government:

— Near Baghdadi, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed two ISIL vehicles.

— Near Rutbah, an airstrike struck an ISIL checkpoint.

— Near Baghdad, Large ISIL Tactical unit destroyed while attempting to rear mount Goats and Sheep.

— Near Beiji, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL motorcycle.

— Near Fallujah, an airstrike destroyed an ISIL vehicle and an ISIL artillery piece.

— Near Habbaniyah, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit.

— Near Kisik, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL fighting position and an ISIL heavy machine gun.

— Near Ramadi, an airstrike struck an ISIL tactical unit and destroyed an ISIL light machine gun and an ISIL recoilless rifle.

— Near Sinjar, two airstrikes struck two ISIL tactical units and destroyed two ISIL fighting positions, two ISIL light machine guns and an ISIL heavy machine gun.

— Near Tal Afar, an airstrike struck an ISIL heavy machine gun firing position.

— Near Tuz, an airstrike destroyed 49 ISIL fighting positions, four ISIL tunnels and an ISIL weapons cache.

Obama’s battle against ISIS is failing By Danielle Pletka Updated 12:26 PM ET, Wed September 2, 2015

Smoke rises above a damaged building following a U.S.-led coalition airstrike against ISIS positions during a military operation to regain control of the eastern suburbs of Ramadi, Iraq, on Saturday, August 15.

Smoke rises over Ramadi after coalition airstrikes fail to uproot ISIS insurgents.

In light of the spiraling disasters throughout the Middle East and North Africa, no one-size-fits-all approach can work against ISIS.

(CNN)It’s been a year since Steven Sotloff was brutally murdered. The images, which have become all too commonplace, shocked the American public — and consequently, the American President — into responding to the horror that the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria has wrought in the Middle East. But countless decapitations, and hundreds of thousands of less infamous (but no less vile) predations later, ISIS continues to flourish.

The United States has no strategy against the terrorist group, and the tactics being pursued by the Obama administration are failing.

In early July, the President took to the airwaves to announce that things were going, well, OK, in the battle against ISIS. “As with any military effort, there will be periods of progress,” he began hopefully, “but there are also going to be some setbacks — as we’ve seen with ISIL’s gains in Ramadi in Iraq and central and southern Syria.”

Danielle Pletka

Yes, Mr. Obama there have been setbacks. And those are not the worst of them.

Why ISIS wants to erase Palmyra's history

Why ISIS wants to erase Palmyra’s history

ISIS, also known as the Islamic State, the Islamic State of Syria and the Levant and as Daesh, a variant of the Arabic acronym for ISIS, has taken Mosul and Ramadi in Iraq, has taken Palmyra in southern Syria and is spreading through Yemen, Libya, Egypt, Afghanistan, Algeria and beyond.

Obama administration officials insist that ISIS is not 10 feet tall and has its own troubles. Senior leaders have been picked off by drones, and the group is at daggers drawn with al Qaeda. All true. But ISIS continues to attract foreign fighters, and intelligence officials admit that despite upwards of 10,000 deaths, the group’s strength is estimated at 20,000 to 30,000, virtually unchanged from when the United States began more intensive operations in 2013.

Retired Gen. John Allen, the Obama administration’s special envoy, insists that ISIS is losing. In an existential sense, he’s right. ISIS isn’t going to run Iraq or Yemen or Syria anytime soon. But it is running statelets in Iraq and Syria and is putting in place the accouterments of the state it claims to be.

Worse yet, what the administration claims to be good news — the intensified engagement of Saudi Arabia and Turkey in the fight — is far from uniformly positive. Both Riyadh and Ankara have been supporting groups that include al Qaeda affiliate Jabhat al Nusra. And the Turks, who have finally woken up to the danger to their own security from ISIS, are more interested in using the new U.S.-Turkish partnership to attack Kurdish groups gaining ground in Syria. In other words, in subcontracting national security policy to others, we have found — surprise — that they do not share our views about the enemy.

In Iraq, ISIS continues to hold substantial and important territory, and notwithstanding efforts by the al-Abadi government in Baghdad, insufficient progress has been made in reconciling the Sunni and Shia factions whose fighting has allowed ISIS to flourish.

Nor, notwithstanding the bizarre partnership between the Islamic Republic of Iran and the Obama White House in Iraq, have Shiite militias “advised” by Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps and occasionally backed by U.S. air power been able to beat back ISIS in a meaningful way.

In Yemen, the story is much the same.

The country’s slow-motion collapse, while less in the headlines than Syria, has pitted the Saudis and their proxies against Iran and its proxies, with the most notable result being benefits for al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and ISIS’ Yemen branch.

Libya, too, is divided between the genuine and more moderate government now holed up in Tobruk, an Islamist government in Tripoli and ISIS and other al Qaeda-related groups growing steadily in the void.

In light of the spiraling disasters throughout the Middle East and North Africa, no one-size-fits-all approach can work. Clearly, intensified effort is needed to help the Iraqi military and to reengage Iraq’s Sunni — likely more military assistance, more aid and deeper engagement by the United States. In Syria, the training that has generated just 60 U.S.-taught members of the Free Syrian Army must ramp up dramatically.

But that’s far from enough; fashioning a transitional government acceptable to the United States and the Syrian people should have already begun. Indeed, each country demands its own separate strategy, but there is one common element: Washington cannot drop in when bad news hits the front pages, as it did when Steven Sotloff, James Foley and Peter Kassig met their grisly ends.

It is tempting to believe that the countries of the region can rise to meet their own challenges, but there is not a scintilla of evidence to support the notion. And while some continue to insist that the nightmare that has driven 11 million people from their homes is somehow not America’s problem, the reality of ISIS’ (and al Qaeda’s) growth and spread and continued strength means that these terrorists will be on our doorstep sooner rather than later.