Cutting ISIL’s money supply – Al Jazeera English

The fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) isn’t just a military one, according to the US government. Cutting off any ties to the global financial system is just as important, according to the US Treasury and State Department.

On Tuesday, the US announced new sanctions against 30 individuals and organisations with ties to ISIL. Those individuals include Tarad Mohammad Aljaraba, a Saudi national who reportedly helps shuttle people in and out of ISIL territory via Turkey, and Aqsa Mahmood, a British national from Glasgow who is being targeted for recruiting women via social media and being a member of an “all-female police unit” in ISIL-held territory in Syria.

The US says this is an important step in the fight against the group but how effective will it be? US officials admit that most of ISIL’s money comes from revenue generated within its own territory in Syria and Iraq. According to the Rand Corporation, oil revenues, selling looted antiquities on the black market and local taxation are the primary sources of funding for the group.

Many analysts say the effect of the new sanctions will be minimal and have little real impact in stopping them.

“The effect will be in the black and grey market,” said Christopher Swift, a National Security Studies professor at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. “Anyone who does business with ISIL will be punished.”

Blaise Misztal, from the Bipartisan Policy Center, added that the sanctions raise, “a red flag for partner countries, such as Turkey, in which these individuals might be trying operate.”

But according to Swift, there’s another important reason for the move. The White House has been pushing the US Congress to give them new legal authority to conduct military operations against ISIL. Earlier this year, US President Barack Obama submitted a draft resolution to lawmakers for the Authorisation for Use of Military Force (AUMF) that would grant him that power.

According to Obama, the authorisation would hand him, “the flexibility to conduct ground combat operations in other, more limited circumstances, such as rescue operations involving US or coalition personnel or the use of special operations forces to take military action against ISIL leadership”. At the moment, US operations have been limited to military training and a bombing campaign.

But so far, the Republican-controlled Congress has yet to pass it. By expanding US powers financially against ISIL, this new move, according to Swift, is an acknowledgement, “that thing [AUMF] is going nowhere”.

Donald Trump: I would send Syrian refugees home:

Donald Trump has said he would send home all Syrian refugees the US accepts, if he becomes president.

The billionaire, who is the current frontrunner in the Republican race for the White House, told a New Hampshire rally: “If I win, they’re going back.”

It marks a reversal in policy – earlier this month he told Fox News the US should take in more refugees.

A migrant crisis has gripped parts of Europe and the US has pledged to take 10,000 refugees from Syria next year.

Half a million people have crossed the Mediterranean into Europe in 2015, with the largest number from Syria, where 250,000 people have been killed in a civil war.

On Wednesday night, Mr Trump told an audience at Keene High School: “I hear we want to take in 200,000 Syrians. And they could be – listen, they could be Isis [Islamic State].”

Describing them as a “200,000-man army”, he later added: “I’m putting the people on notice that are coming here from Syria as part of this mass migration, that if I win, if I win, they’re going back.”

Donald Trump in Keene, New Hampshire
Mr Trump has made immigration a central plank of his election campaign, pledging to build a wall on the southern border.

He was harshly criticised after saying undocumented Mexican immigrants were “bringing drugs, they’re bringing crime, they’re rapists”.

His latest comments about sending Syrians home are more in line with his hardline immigration policy, although at odds with what he said earlier this month.

Asked whether he thought some of the migrants travelling into Europe should be allowed in the US, the business mogul said: “I hate the concept of it, but on a humanitarian basis, with what’s happening, you have to.”

He blamed President Barack Obama for the crisis and added: “It’s living in hell in Syria. They are living in hell.”

Migrants walk through Hungary

The US has allowed 1,500 Syrians to re-settle since the start of the conflict four years ago.

A number of Democrats, including Hillary Clinton, have urged the US to increase the number of Syrians from 10,000 to 65,000.

US Secretary of State John Kerry has pledged to take more refugees worldwide, raising the yearly cap from 70,000 to 85,000 next year and to 100,000 in 2017.

ALERT — Obama forces U.S. Army change to Muslim Brotherhood style patch | RedFlag News

In order to be more ‘Muslim friendly’ Obama has changed the Army’s patches to resemble those of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Notice that none of these now Army Muslim Brotherhood look-a-like patches have an American flag on them? Also, you’ve never seen scimitars on Army patches until now. These patches are on those so called ‘non-fighting’ fighters in Iraq against ISIS.

That’s fitting in Barack Obama’s America, since he so indefatigably aided the Brotherhood when they took power in Egypt and continued to do so even after they were toppled, and since the Brotherhood is a chief competitor to the Islamic State in wanting to establish a caliphate of its own. It’s also a fitting symbol for an America that is ideologically fractured and confused in the face of a growing Islamic jihad threat, and no longer confident of its own heritage or principles.

But this patch has no resemblance to U.S. Army patches of the past, which featured the American eagle and other recognizably American imagery, not the two swords of the Muslim Brotherhood.

In case you’re not sure which is which, the Brotherhood symbol is on the left and the Army patch is on the right.


New Patch for U.S. Troops Fighting ISIS… Looks Like ISIS Logo

by Mac Slavo, SHTFplan.com

Believe it or not, American soldiers fighting against ISIS in Syria and Iraq will actually be wearing the emblem of ISIS – the infamous crossed-swords logo. Well, almost.

Controversy has stirred because many think the patch looks too much like our boys are fighting for the enemy… just another sign of confusion about the counterproductive Obama-led war against the notorious and shamefully exploitative jihadist army.

The Military Times noted that:

“A combat patch worn by U.S. soldiers who served in Iraq on the mission against Islamic State is drawing flak from service members and veterans who say the patch — with its palm wreath, stars and crossed scimitars — looks like something the enemy would wear.”

Site like JihadWatch are arguing that the:

“new U.S. Army patch for fight against the Islamic State closely resembles Muslim Brotherhood logo.”

While the Islamic State is using barbaric tactics to remake the Middle East closer to its own vision of a Caliphate, the United States and its allies also seek to remake the Middle East, and use thespecter of terrorism to aid in regime change in Syria and elsewhere.

The triangulation and cross-purposes are both confusing and aggravating to many Americans.

According to USA Today:

Soldiers in Iraq will soon have a new shoulder sleeve patch to signify their service in the fight against the Islamic State.

All told, there are about 3,335 troops in the region training Iraqi troops, providing security and conducing bombing missions on Islamic State targets in Iraq and neighboring Syria.

The Army’s patch features crossed scimitars, a palm wreath and stars. The scimitars, short swords with curved blades, are meant to symbolize the twin goals of the U.S.-led coalition: to defeat the Islamic State, also referred to as ISIL, and to restore stability in the region, according to Army documents.

Arguably the “twin goals” of Operation Inherent Resolve – better known as the fight against ISIS / ISIL – is fitting with the War on Terrorism in general which always, like a double sword, cut both ways. Symbolically, the double sword cuts both ways, and plays of opposite goals, and embraces conflict, which creates chaos, and begs for a savior and a solution.

But the U.S. has, in fact, created and breathed life into the TV villain known as ISIS. From. the. beginning.

The naked hypocrisy of the U.S. effort to fight ISIS is that the West has been building up and unleashing terrorism upon the Middle East region in order to facilitate chaos and regime change – and give the United States a pretext for stationing troops there, funding budget and spewing rhetoric across the media.

President Bashar al-Assad himself recently called out the United States and other Western allies for actually fostering terrorism – and providing arms, funding, training and soldiers for ISIS and other groups. Assad stated bluntly:

But as for Western cooperation with the al-Nusra Front, this is reality, because we know that Turkey supports al-Nusra and ISIS by providing them with arms, money and terrorist volunteers. And it is well-known that Turkey has close relations with the West. Erdogan and Davutoglu cannot make a single move without coordinating first with the United States and other Western countries.

Al-Nusra and ISIS operate with such a force in the region under Western cover, because Western states have always believed that terrorism is a card they can pull from their pocket and use from time to time. Now, they want to use al-Nusra just against ISIS, maybe because ISIS is out of control one way or another. But that doesn’t mean they want to eradicate ISIS. Had they wanted to do so, they would have been able to do that.

Meanwhile, Putin put in a “call” at the global poker table, vowing to take on ISIS and defend Assad with its own fighter jets, tanks and military equipment.

In a taunting and vexing spin on the United States’ own mission in the Middle East, Putin invited the West to join hands and eradicate ISIS once and for all, as SHTF recently reported.

Moscow, realizing that instead of undertaking an earnest effort to fight terror in Syria, the US had simply adopted a containment strategy for ISIS while holding the group up to the public as the boogeyman par excellence, publicly invited Washington to join Russia in a once-and-for-all push to wipe Islamic State from the face of the earth.

Of course The Kremlin knew the US wanted no such thing until Assad was gone, but by extending the invitation, Putin had literally called Washington’s bluff, forcing The White House to either admit that this isn’t about ISIS at all, or else join Russia in fighting them. The genius of that move is that if Washington does indeed coordinate its efforts to fight ISIS with Moscow, the US will be fighting to stabilize the very regime it sought to oust. 

But Putin won’t be holding his breath. Neither should we.

Should we view the patch as a U.S. “resolve” to stop ISIS, or as part of the “inherent” contradiction that serves the larger purpose of terrorism and U.S. foreign policy at the expense of U.S. troops, U.S. taxpayer money and U.S. sovereignty?

And is WWIII near when the U.S. and Russia lock heads so pointedly as they are right now? And who is the real enemy?

Are Aircraft Carriers Worth the Cost? Or is this Obama wanting to do more damage to our Military?

The Navy’s operations, on which the sun never sets, are the nation’s nerve endings, connecting it with the turbulent world. Although the next president may be elected without addressing the Navy’s proper size and configuration, for four years he or she will be acutely aware of where the carriers are. Today they are at the center of a debate about their continuing centrality, even viability, in the Navy’s projection of force. Far out into the South China Sea, China is manufacturing mini-islands out of reefs, many of which used to be underwater at high tide. China is asserting sovereignty above and around these militarized specks in the congested cauldron of this sea. Through it and adjoining straits pass half the world’s seaborne tonnage; five of America’s most important 15 trading partners are in this region. Until President Trump launches his many trade wars, those partners include China, which is America’s third-largest export market and largest source of imports. The Obama administration has rejected challenging China’s audacity by not sailing through its claimed territorial waters — within twelve miles — around the new reef-islands. RELATED: The U.S. Navy Needs to Radically Reassess How It Projects Power Henry J. Hendrix of the Center for a New American Security argues that, like the battleships which carriers were originally designed to support, carriers may now be too expensive and vulnerable. China has developed land-based anti-ship missiles to force carriers to operate so far from targets that manned aircraft might become less useful than unmanned combat aerial vehicles (UCAVs) operating from smaller, less expensive carriers. The newest carrier, the U.S.S. Gerald R. Ford, to be commissioned next year, cost $12.8 billion. Add the costs of the air wing, the support of five surface-combat ships and one attack submarine, and 6,700 sailors. The bill for operating a carrier group: $2.5 million a day. China, says Hendrix, could build more than 1,200 of its premier anti-ship missiles for the cost of one Ford carrier, and one of the 1,200 could achieve “mission-kill,” removing the carrier from the fight for months. The bad news is that America’s entitlement state is devouring the federal budget. The good news might be this axiom: As money gets scarcer, people get smarter.

“Europe: Seizing Homes to House Muslim Migrants” – Hampshire Hog

Source: “Europe: Seizing Homes to House Muslim Migrants”

Idiot who draws on the experience of ONE PERSON to condemn an entire continent.
“In a deeply disturbing development in the Muslim invasion of Europe, Europeans are being forced from their homes to accommodate the invaders… Swedes’ homes may be confiscated to accommodate asylum seekers using obscure legislation from 1992, the “Threat and Risk Assessment Commission”… “German nurse shocked after being forced out of flat to make way for […]

https://gachiyellow.wordpress.com/2015/09/29/europe-seizing-homes-to-house-muslim-migrants/

Putin’s Jets in Syria Are a Threat to the U.S. 

On Sept. 30, Russian lawmakers unanimously approved Pres. Vladimir Putin’s plan to begin combat operations in Syria — and hours later Moscow’s warplanes in the region began attacking ISIS militants.

Right before the bombs rained down, a Russian general arrived in Baghdad warned the U.S. military planners to keep America’s own warplanes out of the way. U.S. officials said they would not alter their flight plans.

This is the beginning of a dangerous new phase of the international intervention in the Syrian civil war. Not only has Russia tried to order U.S. forces to step aside, it actually has the firepower to back up its demands. Some of the 35 warplanes Russia has deployed to Syria are specifically designed for fighting foes like the United States, not ISIS.

Seemingly out of nowhere on Sept. 21, they appeared at an air base in Latakia, a regime stronghold in western Syria—28 of the Russian air force’s best warplanes, including four Su-30 fighters and a number of Su-25 attack planes and Su-24 bombers.

Soon six more Su-34 bombers and at least one Il-20 spy plane followed, part of a contingent of Russia forces reportedly including some 500 troops plus armored vehicles and SA-15 and SA-22 surface-to-air missiles.

For U.S. and allied officials observing the deployment, there has been plenty of cause for confusion…and alarm. It’s not just that, more than four years into Syria’s bloody civil war, Russia has decided to jump in and make things more complicated.

No, it’s what kinds of weapons—planes and missiles, especially—Moscow decided to send, and what those weapons say about the Kremlin’s ultimate plan in Syria. Many of them don’t seem to be well-suited to fighting ISIS. They’re built to battle adversaries like the United States.

To be clear, 35 warplanes and a few surface-to-air missiles aren’t a lot in the grand scheme of things. There’s no shortage of military aircraft flying over Syria five years into the country’s bloody civil war.

Every day some of Syria’s aging Soviet-made planes —from the 300 or so that have survived four years of combat—take off from regime airfields to bomb ISIS militants and secular rebels slowly advancing on Syria’s main population centers.

Meanwhile hundreds of jets from the American-led international coalition have been waging, since the fall of 2014, an intensive air campaign against ISIS and al Qaeda targeting just the militants.

What’s weird and alarming about the Russian contingent is that it’s not really optimal for attacking lightly armed insurgent fighters. Surface-to-air missiles are only good for destroying enemy aircraft, which Syrian rebels do not possess. And the Su-30s are best suited for tangling with other high-tech forces.

Who in region possesses these high-tech forces? The United States, for one. Israel, too. Why, the United States, of course. Russia’s warplanes and missiles in Syria could pose a threat to America’s own aircraft flying over the country—all in order to carve out and preserve a portion of Syria that the United States can’t touch.

Russia’s warplanes and missiles in Syria could pose a threat to America’s own aircraft flying over the country—all in order to carve out and preserve a portion of Syria that the United States can’t touch.

Officially, Russia has deployed its forces to Syria to reinforce embattled Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and help defeat the self-proclaimed Islamic State.

“There is no other way to settle the Syrian conflict other than by strengthening the existing legitimate government agencies, support them in their fight against terrorism,” Russian President Vladimir Putin said in an interview with American news networks ahead of his Sept. 28 meeting with President Obama at the United Nations in New York City.

“There are more than 2,000 militants in Syria from the former Soviet Union,” Putin said. “Instead of waiting for them to return home we should help President al-Assad fight them there, in Syria.”

Syria crisis: Russian airstrikes against Assad enemies.

Russian Su-24 fighter-bomber (file photo)

Russia has begun carrying out air strikes in Syria against opponents of President Bashar al-Assad.

The strikes reportedly hit rebel-controlled areas of Homs and Hama provinces, causing casualties.

The US says it was informed an hour before they took place.

Russian defence officials say aircraft targeted the Islamic State group, but an unnamed US official told Reuters that so far they did not appear to be targeting IS-held territory.

Syria’s civil war has raged for four years, with an array of armed groups fighting to overthrow the government.

The US and its allies have insisted that President Assad should leave office, while Russia has backed its ally remaining in power.


Russian fighter jets and helicopters at a military base in the government-controlled coastal Syrian city of LatakiaAnalysis: Jonathan Marcus, defence and diplomatic correspondent

Russia’s decision to intervene with its air power greatly complicates the Syrian crisis while probably offering little additional chance of a diplomatic resolution.

Russian sources indicate that Sukhoi Su-24 warplanes were involved, operating out of an airbase near Latakia.

There are serious questions about who exactly the Russian aircraft are targeting. US officials believe that the initial Russian strikes are not in IS-held territory, raising the possibility that Russian air power is being utilised more in the form of close air support for Syrian government forces against the multiple enemies of the Assad regime.

Of course, many of these enemies are supported by the West’s Arab allies or Turkey. The warning time given by the Russians to the Americans announcing the start of their operations may also raise some eyebrows, suggesting that much more detailed co-ordination may be needed in future to avoid incidents in Syrian airspace.


The upper house of the Russian parliament granted President Vladimir Putin permission to deploy the Russian air force in Syria.

The Russian defence ministry said the country’s air force had targeted IS military equipment, communication facilities, arms depots, ammunition and fuel supplies.

Syrian opposition activists said Russian warplanes had hit towns including Zafaraneh, Rastan ands Talbiseh, resulting in the deaths of 36 people, a number of them children.

None of the areas targeted were controlled by IS, activists said.

In a televised address, Mr Putin said the airstrikes were targeting Islamist militants – including Russian citizens – who have taken over large parts of Syria and Iraq.

“If they [militants] succeed in Syria, they will return to their home country, and they will come to Russia, too,” he said.

He added that Russia was not going to send ground troops to Syria, and that its role in Syrian army operations would be limited.

“We certainly are not going to plunge head-on into this conflict… we will be supporting the Syrian army purely in its legitimate fight with terrorist groups.”

Mr Putin also said he expected President Assad to talk with the Syrian opposition about a political settlement, but clarified that he was referring to what he described as “healthy” opposition groups.

A US defence official said: “A Russian official in Baghdad this morning informed US embassy personnel that Russian military aircraft would begin flying anti-Isil [IS] missions today over Syria. He further requested that US aircraft avoid Syrian airspace during these missions.”

US state department spokesman John Kirby told reporters: “The US-led coalition will continue to fly missions over Iraq and Syria as planned and in support of our international mission to degrade and destroy Isil [IS].”

map

Syria’s civil war

Homs city

What’s the human cost?

More than 250,000 Syrians have been killed and a million injured in four-and-a-half years of armed conflict, which began with anti-government protests before escalating into a full-scale civil war.

And the survivors?

More than 11 million others have been forced from their homes, four million of them abroad, as forces loyal to President Assad and those opposed to his rule battle each other – as well as jihadist militants from IS and other groups. Growing numbers of refugees are going to Europe.

How has the world reacted?

Regional and world powers have also been drawn into the conflict. Iran and Russia, along with Lebanon’s Hezbollah movement, are propping up the Alawite-led government. Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Qatar are backing the Sunni-dominated opposition, along with the US, UK and France.

Daesh launches first attack on Afghan government forces

KABUL, Afghanistan

Daesh launched its first attack on the Afghan security forces early Sunday with hundreds of fighters attacking police posts in eastern Nangarhar province, officials said.

Daesh, which emerged in Afghanistan in 2014 and has grown by imposing itself on the Taliban’s recruiting ground, attacked up to 10 posts in Achin district, around 150 kilometers (93 miles) east of capital Kabul.

District chief Haji Ghalib Mujahid said the attacks were launched simultaneously at 3 a.m. local time (2230GMT).

“Our forces managed to repel their attack but the fight is underway,” he told Anadolu Agency. Several militants have been reported killed and wounded while three Afghan soldiers were killed and eight others injured.

The attacks came just after the UN warned of Daesh’s growing presence in Afghanistan as a U.S.-led international security force looks to withdraw at the end of 2016.

Nicholas Haysom, UN’s envoy to Afghanistan, warned the group had established a “toehold” in Afghanistan.

Daesh has fought the Taliban repeatedly over territory in Nangarhar and targeted young men for membership in areas previously under the sway of the Taliban. The new group claims to have usurped the Taliban in five districts.

There are concerns that the emergence of Daesh could change the nature of the insurgency in Afghanistan, where 13,000 foreign troops remain following the withdrawal of most last year.

Russia Surprises U.S. With Accord on Battling ISIS – The New York Times

UNITED NATIONS — For the second time this month, Russia moved to expand its political and military influence in the Syria conflict and left the United States scrambling, this time by reaching an understanding, announced on Sunday, with Iraq, Syria and Iran to share intelligence about the Islamic State.

Like Russia’s earlier move to bolster the government of President Bashar al-Assad by deploying warplanes and tanks to a base near Latakia, Syria, the intelligence-sharing arrangement was sealed without notice to the United States. American officials knew that a group of Russian military officers were in Baghdad, but they were clearly surprised when the Iraqi military’s Joint Operations Command announced the intelligence sharing accord on Sunday.

President Vladimir V. Putin will be speaking at the United Nations General Assembly for the first time in 10 years.Vladimir Putin of Russia to Focus on Syria at U.N.SEPT. 27, 2015
News Analysis: On Syria, Putin Is Catering to an Audience at HomeSEPT. 26, 2015
Spanish police officers arrested an 18-year-old Moroccan woman this month who was suspected of recruiting volunteers for ISIS.Thousands Enter Syria to Join ISIS Despite Global EffortsSEPT. 26, 2015
Syrians in a destroyed section of Douma, east of Damascus. Russia has offered to hold talks with the United States on Syria.Putin Sees Path to Diplomacy Through SyriaSEPT. 16, 2015
It was another sign that President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia was moving ahead with a sharply different tack from that of the Obama administration in battling the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, by assembling a rival coalition that includes Iran and the Syrian government.

Secretary of State John Kerry and Sergey V. Lavrov, Russia’s foreign minister, met Sunday amid tensions between the countries. Credit Dominick Reuter/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
The effort, which Mr. Putin is expected to underscore in his speech at the United Nations on Monday, not only puts Moscow in a position to give military support to Mr. Assad, its longtime ally in the Middle East, but could also enable the Kremlin to influence the choice of a successor if Mr. Assad were to eventually leave power.

Russia’s moves are raising difficult questions for the Obama administration, which remains deeply conflicted about American military involvement in the Syria conflict. Ensuring that the Russian military and the United States-led coalition, which is carrying out airstrikes against the Islamic State, “deconflict” and avoid running into each other is only part of the problem: The Obama administration and the Kremlin do not appear to agree even on the main reason for the conflict.

American officials, who have long cast Mr. Assad as the primary source of instability in Syria, assert that the Syrian leader’s brutal crackdown provided an opening for jihadist groups and that the crisis cannot be resolved until a political transition is negotiated that requires him to leave power. But Russian officials see the Syrian government as a bulwark against further gains by groups like Islamic State and Nusra Front and sometimes suggest that the defeat of the Islamic State should come before a negotiated solution for the Syrian conflict.

Even as the United States has banked on a diplomatic strategy of trying to enlist Russia’s cooperation in Syria, the Kremlin has continued to jolt the White House with its unilateral military and political moves.

“This is not yet coordinated,” Secretary of State John Kerry said Sunday at the start of a meeting in New York with Sergey V. Lavrov, the Russian foreign minister. “Our presidents will be meeting tomorrow. This is the beginning of a genuine effort to see if there is a way to deconflict, but also to find a way forward that will be effective in keeping a united, secular Syria that can be at peace and stable again without foreign troops present, and that’s our hope.”

 

Robert S. Ford, the former American ambassador to Syria, said that Russian officials have long said they are not wedded to Mr. Assad but have insisted his government is legitimate and rebuffed efforts to impose a successor.

Adding to the United States’ concern, Russian surveillance drones have conducted about half a dozen reconnaissance missions from a recently bolstered base near Latakia. The drones have flown over Latakia, western Idlib, and western Hama, according to a senior United States official who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss confidential intelligence assessments.

American analysts have not detected any Islamic State fighters in those areas, the official said. That raises the prospect that, despite its stated focus of fighting the Islamic State, Russia may take the opportunity to attack Syrian opposition fighters who are focused on battling Mr. Assad’s government and who are also backed by the United States.

Mr. Putin has been dismissive of the Pentagon program to train and equip the moderate Syria opposition — an effort that has yielded only a small handful of fighters. At the same time, new volunteers have been arriving to replenish the ranks of the Islamic State even more quickly than they are killed.

Graphic: ISIS Finances Are Strong
Through it all, the United States and some of its allies have focused on expanding an airstrike campaign against ISIS in Syria and Iraq. But the latest Russian moves in Syria have raised important questions about the American relationship with another crucial ally against the Islamic State: Iraq.

With about 3,500 American advisers, trainers and other military personnel in his country, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi of Iraq has cast himself as a vital member of the United States-led coalition to combat the Islamic State.

However, the Shiite-dominated Iraqi government, which has long been anxious that ousting Mr. Assad might strengthen the Islamic State, has also quietly enabled the Russian military buildup in Syria. While Bulgaria closed its airspace to Russian transport planes headed to Syria at the request of the United States, Iraq has allowed the Russian flights in its airspace.

“We did not violate any of our commitments toward the international community,” Ibrahim al-Jafari, Iraq’s foreign minister, said when he was asked about the Russian flights on Friday at the Council on Foreign Relations.

The Iraqi military statement said that Russia, Iran, Syria and Iraq would “participate in collecting information about ISIS terrorism,” an arrangement it said was important because of concerns that thousands of volunteers who have joined the Islamic State have come from Russia.

American officials sought to play down the significance of the agreement but objected to the Syrian government’s participation in the intelligence sharing.

“We do not support the presence of Syrian government officials who are part of a regime that has brutalized its own citizens,” Col. Steven H. Warren, a Baghdad-based spokesman for the American-led coalition, said.

But some experts say that Iraq’s response to the Russians reflects the fractured nature of decision-making in Baghdad, its attempt to navigate a middle ground between the United States and Iran and that the Iraqi government has a divergent reading of how to deal with Syria.

“Power and authority in Iraq have become increasingly diffused, with various players now exercising unilateral power over the use of force,” said Ramzy Mardini, a nonresident fellow at the Atlantic Council.

“Neutrality is the best Washington can hope for in Baghdad,” Mr. Mardini said. “Iraq is still a fragile state whose leaders are exposed to politics. In the discourse of Iraqi politics, forcing Abadi to side with the U.S. against Assad is like realigning him with the Sunni axis against the Shia one.”

France launches first airstrikes against ISIS in Syria – CNN.com

(CNN)The French military has carried out its first airstrikes against ISIS in Syria, according to a statement from the office of France’s presidency.

The country had announced earlier this month that it would expand its aerial campaign against ISIS in Iraq — which it began a year ago — to include the militant group’s positions in Syria.

The French president’s office said that the strikes in Syria, which began Sunday, were based on intelligence gathered from air surveillance operations conducted over Syria during the past two weeks.

“Our country confirms its firm commitment to the fight against the terrorist threat Daesh,” the statement said, using the Arabic acronym for ISIS. “We will strike whenever our national security is at stake.”

President Francois Hollande, speaking on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly in New York, described the camp as a “threat to our country.”

“We reached our goal and the whole training camp was destroyed,” Hollande said.

Six aircraft were used in the mission, which was led by the French but closely coordinated with the U.S.-led coalition, he said.

Despite the “horrible acts” committed by ISIS, Hollande placed the blame for the Syrian crisis on the country’s long time strongman Bashar al-Assad.

“Bashar al Assad is the main person at fault, although Daesh commits horrible acts,” Hollande said. “The future of Syria cannot happen with Bashar al Assad.”

String of terrorist attacks

France has been the site of a number of terrorist attacks this year.

Islamic extremists killed 17 people in a quick succession of attacks in Paris in January, including the shooting deaths of staff members in the offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo.

In June, authorities said a man in southeastern France decapitated his boss, displayed the severed head with Islamist banners and also set off an explosion in a factory. And last month, three American men brought down a suspected terrorist gunman who tried to open fire on a train bound for France.

But France has also linked the refugee crisis Europe is facing in part to ISIS, saying it would strike the group for driving thousands of civilians out of Syria. “We’re not going to receive 4 to 5 million Syrians, so the problem has to be dealt with at source,” French Prime Minister Manuel Valls told CNN’s Christiane Amanpour.

France has been in talks with Russia about a political solution in Syria.

“Russia supports the regime of Bashar (al) Assad. But it also wants to find a political solution. And anyway, there will not be any political solution without a dialogue with all of the parties who directly or indirectly are involved with Syria,” Valls said.

France also planned to hold talks about Syria with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.

 

Video: London Mosque fire: over 70 firefighters tackle blaze – Telegraph

Ten fire engines sent to Baitul Futuh mosque in south London to attend the fire

Source: Video: London Mosque fire: over 70 firefighters tackle blaze – Telegraph

A large fire has has broken out at a south London mosque.

There are 70 firefighters tackling the blaze at the Baitul Futuh mosque in Morden.

The London Fire Brigade (LFB) sent investigating officers and the incident has been referred to the police.

Thick black smoke rises from the Baitul Futuh mosque in south London (@Doggy_Boutique)

One man in his 40s has been taken to hospital after being treated for smoke inhalation.

A LFB spokesman said: “We have 10 fire engines and 70 firefighters there. The fire is affecting the building’s ground and first floors. It would be fair to say it is a large fire.”

A member of the public reported the blaze at 12.06 pm. The spokesman said it is too early to say what has caused the blaze.

A London Ambulance Service spokesman said: “We treated a male, reported in be in his 40s, with smoke inhalation and took him to St George’s Hospital as a priority.”

Roads have been closed in the suburban neighbourhood surrounding the mosque, which is thought to be one of the largest in Western Europe.

Transport for London said the A24, which feeds the busy Morden town centre, is shut both ways, northbound and southbound.

Trains are not stopping at Morden South railway station, which is near the mosque.

Smoke pours from the building (Storyful / Twitter / @Doggy_Boutiqe)

A Met Police spokesman said: “We were called to the scene to reports a fire at 12.18. Local road closures are in place.”

The mosque was built on the site of the old Express Dairies in 1999 for the Ahmadiyya Muslim community to provide people with a meeting place and somewhere to hold social religious events.

Deadly violence erupts in CAR over killing of Muslim – Al Jazeera English

At least 21 people have been killed and 100 wounded in Bangui, the capital of Central African Republic. as Muslims attacked a mainly Christian neighborhood, medical officials and witnesses have said.

Saturday’s attack came after a Muslim man was killed and his body was found dumped in the street, witnesses and a Muslim group spokesman, Ousmane Abakar, told news agencies.

Two years of violence, which erupted after Muslim Seleka rebels seized power in the majority Christian country in 2013, has killed thousands of people and forced hundreds of thousands to leave their homes.

The fighting divided the country when Muslims were chased from the south.

There had not been any attacks in Bangui, which is secured by French and UN soldiers, for months until a grenade attack earlier in September.

In Saturday’s incident, angry Muslims left their stronghold in the 3rd district of Bangui and attacked the largely Christian Fifth district using automatic weapons.

Residents fled to other parts of the capital and attackers burned houses and cars, witnesses said.

UN helicopters, part of a peacekeeping force, flew overhead.

Thousands Enter Syria to Join ISIS Despite Global Efforts – The New York Times

Nearly 30,000 foreign recruits have now poured into Syria to join the civil war, stark evidence that an international effort to enforce antiterrorism laws is not diminishing the militants’ ranks.

WASHINGTON — Nearly 30,000 foreign recruits have now poured into Syria, many to join the Islamic State, a doubling of volunteers in just the past 12 months and stark evidence that an international effort to tighten borders, share intelligence and enforce antiterrorism laws is not diminishing the ranks of new militant fighters.

Among those who have entered or tried to enter the conflict in Iraq or Syria are more than 250 Americans, up from about 100 a year ago, according to intelligence and law enforcement officials.

Images from recordings at Gatwick Airport show, from left, Khadiza Sultana, Shamima Begum and Amira Abase passing through security before flying to Turkey.Jihad and Girl Power: How ISIS Lured 3 London GirlsAUG. 17, 2015
Alex, a 23-year-old Sunday school teacher from rural Washington State, spent hours a day online learning about Islam from supporters of the Islamic State.ISIS and the Lonely Young AmericanJUNE 27, 2015
Her Majesty’s JihadistsAPRIL 14, 2015
A 12-year-old girl in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq.The Islamic State Is Forcing Women to Be Sex SlavesAUG. 20, 2015
In a speech before the United Nations on Wednesday, President Obama asked the world to join the fight against the Islamic State.In U.N. Speech, Obama Vows to Fight ISIS ‘Network of Death’SEPT. 24, 2014
President Obama will take stock of the international campaign to counter the Islamic State at the United Nations on Tuesday, a public accounting that comes as American intelligence analysts have been preparing a confidential assessment that concludes that nearly 30,000 foreign fighters have traveled to Iraq and Syria from more than 100 countries since 2011. A year ago, the same officials estimated that flow to be about 15,000 combatants from 80 countries, mostly to join the Islamic State.

A $500 million Pentagon effort to train rebel forces to take on the Islamic State in Syria has produced only a handful of fighters. Russia has defied American attempts to block Moscow’s buildup of a new air base with warplanes in Syria — a topic Mr. Obama will discuss with President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia at the United Nations on Monday. And in a break in continuity for the mission, John R. Allen, the retired four-star general who since September 2014 has served as the diplomatic envoy coordinating the coalition against the Islamic State, has told the White House that he will step down at the end of the year.

The focus on shortcomings in the global effort to combat the Islamic State, also known as ISIL or ISIS, is playing out as tens of thousands of refugees flee strife in the Middle East and North Africa, including many seeking to escape the violence in Syria and oppression in areas under the control of the Islamic State.

A year ago, Mr. Obama and other top American officials spent a great deal of diplomatic capital rallying support for a legally binding Security Council resolution that would compel all 193 United Nations member states to take steps to “prevent and suppress” the flow of their citizens into the arms of groups that each country considers to be a terrorist organization.

At the United Nations meeting on Tuesday, chaired by the president, the heads of state and government from Iraq, Nigeria and Norway will speak; all told, 104 countries have been invited to the event. Iran has not been invited, American officials said.

Despite Pentagon reports that coalition strikes have killed about 10,000 Islamic State fighters, the group continues to replenish its ranks, drawing an average of about 1,000 fighters a month. The government several months ago last publicly assessed the flow at “more than 25,000,” including at least 4,500 from the West. Given the region’s porous borders, American officials emphasize that their figures are rough estimates not precise head counts, based on allies’ reports on citizens’ travel and other intelligence, which vary by country.

“By now there is a ‘network effect’ where friends, family are bringing along other friends and family,” said Daniel L. Byman, a counterterrorism expert who is a professor at Georgetown University and a fellow at the Brookings Institution.

In a new bipartisan report after a six-month investigation, the House Homeland Security Committee criticizes the administration and its allies for failing to do more to combat the threat from foreign fighters.
President Obama spoke about ways to counter the radical ideologies of groups like Al Qaeda and the Islamic State during a speech at the United Nations General Assembly in September 2014. By UNTV and VIA ASSOCIATED PRESS on Publish Date September 26, 2015. Watch in Times Video »
“Foreign partners are still sharing information about terrorist suspects in a manner which is ad hoc, intermittent, and often incomplete,” says the 85-page report. Its release is timed to the meeting at the United Nations. “There is currently no comprehensive global database of foreign fighter names,” it says. “Instead, countries including the U.S. rely on a weak, patchwork system for swapping individual extremist identities.”

Some counterterrorism analysts have identified what they say are more positive trends. The more than 7,000 military strikes against Islamic State in Iraq and Syria have largely contained the group in its core territory, they say, and international efforts to strengthen border security and share information about suspected fighters have largely stopped the Islamic State from expanding at the accelerated pace it did in the summer of 2014. Other indicators also suggest that the Islamic State’s ability to recruit and retain followers may be slowing.

A small but growing number of defectors from the Islamic State are risking reprisals and imprisonment to speak out about their disillusionment with the extremist group, according to a report published this month by the International Center for the Study for Radicalization at King’s College London.

“ISIS no longer has the momentum in its core territory of Syria and Iraq,” said Peter Neumann, director of the center and a professor of security studies at King’s College. “It’s no longer the ever-expanding jihadist utopia that it seemed to be.”

In Britain, more than 750 people have traveled to take part in terrorist-related activity in Syria and Iraq, up from about 500 a year ago. About half of those have returned home, raising fears that they could carry out attacks on British soil. And since September 2014, 34 countries, including the United States, have arrested foreign terrorist fighters or aspirants. The United States has active criminal cases against almost 50 foreign fighter suspects.

The United Nations Counter-Terrorism office has recommended that countries take urgent measures to disrupt travel by would-be fighters. At the moment, only five of 21 high-priority countries surveyed require advance passenger information or passenger name records, making it virtually impossible to flag suspects who might be flying to conflict zones in incremental steps, rather than taking direct flights that would invite scrutiny.

Most countries have passed laws to restrict “incitement” to terrorist acts, but in some places those laws are so broad that they prevent free expression. Most countries, however, do not have laws that enable them to prosecute those suspected of planning travel to a country to commit terrorist acts or receive terrorist training; of the 21 countries, only five had such laws.

Amid the spate of new laws, human rights groups warn of a possible backlash if governments go too far in muzzling dissent and in turn, send even more of their citizens into the arms of radical extremists. Efforts to stop fighters from rallying to the side of ISIS put the greatest scrutiny on countries like Turkey, whose long porous border has allowed thousands of militants to cross into Syria and Iraq. Turkey has openly supported some rebels who have sought to unseat Syria’s president, Bashar al-Assad, but lately it has faced the direct ire of the Islamic State.

Under stiff international pressure, Turkey has increased detentions, arrests, and prosecution of suspected foreign fighters, increased its information sharing with allied partners, and is taking steps to improve the security of its border, Western officials said.

“Turkey has turned a corner, having recognized the impact of this problem on its own society,” said Thomas Krajeski, a former United States ambassador to Yemen who last week completed a yearlong tour as the State Department’s senior adviser on foreign terrorist fighters.

Germany, Morocco and Tunisia have all passed new laws criminalizing support to terrorist groups, fighting or training in conflict areas, or recruitment for such acts. France has passed a new law since last year’s Council resolution that prevents French citizens and residents from leaving French territory if they are suspected of intending to join a terrorist group.

Perhaps most far-reaching, a new law requires Internet companies to provide the French government with metadata in real time, at the request of intelligence agencies, in suspected terrorist cases.

Still, France finds itself reeling. Its Prime Minister, Manuel Valls, told the French Parliament this month that 1,800 French citizens and residents are believed to be enlisted in jihadist networks worldwide. Among them close to 500 are still in Syria and Iraq, and 133 have died in combat.

Ben Carson Exposes Islamic Taqiyya | Frontpage Mag

Originally published by PJ Media.

Raymond Ibrahim is a Shillman Fellow at the David Horowitz freedom Center.

Of all the points presidential candidate Ben Carson made in defense of his position that he “would not advocate that we put a Muslim in charge of this nation,” most poignant is his reference to taqiyya, one of Islam’s doctrines of deception.

According to Carson, whoever becomes president should be “sworn in on a stack of Bibles, not a Koran”:

“I do not believe Sharia is consistent with the Constitution of this country,” Carson said, referencing the Islamic law derived from the Koran and traditions of Islam. “Muslims feel that their religion is very much a part of your public life and what you do as a public official, and that’s inconsistent with our principles and our Constitution.”

Carson said that the only exception he’d make would be if the Muslim running for office “publicly rejected all the tenants of Sharia and lived a life consistent with that.”

“Then I wouldn’t have any problem,” he said.

However, on several occasions Carson mentioned “Taqiyya,” a practice in the Shia Islam denomination in which a Muslim can mislead nonbelievers about the nature of their faith to avoid religious persecution.

“Taqiyya is a component of Shia that allows, and even encourages you to lie to achieve your goals,” Carson said.

There’s much to be said here.  First, considering that the current U.S. president has expunged all reference to Islam in security documents and would have Americans believe that Islamic doctrine is more or less like Christianity, it is certainly refreshing to see a presidential candidate referencing a little known but critically important Muslim doctrine.

As for the widely cited notion that taqiyya is a Shia doctrine, this needs to be corrected, as it lets the world’s vast majority of Muslims, the Sunnis, off the hook.  According to Sami Mukaram, one of the world’s foremost authorities on taqiyya,

Taqiyya is of fundamental importance in Islam. Practically every Islamic sect agrees to it and practices it … We can go so far as to say that the practice of taqiyya is mainstream in Islam, and that those few sects not practicing it diverge from the mainstream … Taqiyya is very prevalent in Islamic politics, especially in the modern era. ​

Taqiyya is often associated with the Shias because, as a persecuted minority group interspersed among their Sunni rivals, they have historically had more reason to dissemble. Today, however, Sunnis living in the West find themselves in the place of the Shia. Now they are the minority surrounded by their historic enemies—Western “infidels”—and so they too have plenty of occasion to employ taqiyya.

Nor would making Muslims swear on Bibles be very effective. As long as their allegiance to Islam is secure in their hearts, Muslims can behave like non-Muslims—including by praying before Christian icons, wearing crosses, and making the sign of the cross—anything short of actually killing a Muslim, which is when the taqiyya goes too far (hence why Muslims in the U.S. military often expose their true loyalties when they finally reach the point of having to fight fellow Muslims in foreign nations).

For those with a discerning eye, taqiyya is all around us.  Whether Muslim refugees pretending to convert to Christianity (past and present), or whether an Islamic gunman gaining entrance inside a church by feigning interest in Christian prayers—examples abound on a daily basis.

Consider the following anecdote from Turkey.  In order to get close enough to a Christian pastor to assassinate him, a group of Muslims, including three women, feigned interest in Christianity, attended his church, and even participated in baptism ceremonies.

“These people had infiltrated our church and collected information about me, my family and the church and were preparing an attack against us,” said the pastor in question, Emre Karaali: “Two of them attended our church for over a year and they were like family.”

If some Muslims are willing to go to such lengths to eliminate the already downtrodden Christian minorities in their midst—attending churches and baptisms and becoming “like family” to those “infidels” they intend to kill—does anyone doubt that a taqiyya-practicing Muslim presidential candidate might have no reservations about swearing on a stack of Bibles?

Precedents for such treachery litter the whole of Islamic history—and begin with the Muslim prophet himself: During the Battle of the Trench (627 AD), which pitted Muhammad and his followers against several non-Muslim tribes collectively known as “the Confederates,” a Confederate called Naim bin Masud went to the Muslim camp and converted to Islam. When Muhammad discovered the Confederates were unaware of Masud’s deflection to Islam, he counseled him to return and try somehow to get his tribesmen to abandon the siege. “For war is deceit,” Muhammad assured him.

Masud returned to the Confederates without their knowledge that he had switched sides and began giving his former kin and allies bad advice. He also intentionally instigated quarrels between the various tribes until, thoroughly distrusting each other, they disbanded and lifted the siege, allowing an embryonic Islam to grow.  (One Muslim website extols this incident for being illustrative of how Muslims can subvert non-Muslims.)

In short, if a Muslim were running for president of the U.S. in the hopes of ultimately subverting America to Islam, he could, in Carson’s words, easily be “sworn in on a stack of Bibles, not a Koran” and “publicly reject all the tenants of Sharia.”  Indeed, he could claim to be a Christian and attend church every week.

It speaks very well about Carson that he is aware of—and not hesitant to mention—taqiyya.  But that doctrine’s full ramifications—how much deceiving it truly allows and for all Muslim denominations, not just the Shia—needs to be more widely embraced.

The chances of that happening are dim.  Already “mainstream media” like the Washington Post are taking Carson to task for “misunderstanding” taqiyya—that is, for daring to be critical of anything Islamic.  These outlets could benefit from learning more about Islam and deception per the below links:

Moderate Muslims Call for Jihad Against America |

While I was doing some research, I ran across a youtube video that jumped out like a neon sign. It was taken at an Islamic conference in a large room with several hundred people. The speaker was talking about the non-Muslim perception of radical Muslims and in a short 3:22 second video he cleared up any question one may have about the difference between a moderate Muslim and a radical Muslim. In his arrogant presentation, he asked this convention of ‘moderate Muslims” specific questions about their core beliefs and had the audience respond to those questions by raising their hands. One important question he raised was: How many of you agree that the punishments described in the Koran and the Sunnah, whether it is death, whether it is stoning for adultery, whatever it is, if it is from Allah and his messenger, that is the best punishment ever possible for humankind, and that is what we should apply in the world? Well, who agrees with that? Nearly every hand went up.

This video exposed what Muslims think worldwide. It got me curious, so I started investigating. I wanted to know the difference in a moderate Muslim and a radical Muslim. What I found was a devious plot put in place by the Muslim Brotherhood in 1982 to take over the world through any means necessary. Hence, the concept of the “moderate Muslim” was born. In a document called “The Project” a plan was laid out for a terrorist “secret apparatus” that eventually would culminate in the creation of Hamas in December 1987 and the unveiling of the Hamas charter in August 1988. It was a 14-page plan written in Arabic and dated December 1, 1982 that outlined a 12-point strategy to “establish an Islamic government on earth.”

Through subterfuge, lies, deception, and murder the Muslim Brotherhood has carefully implemented this evil plan into the fabric of every nation in the west. Consequently, there is no free nation on earth who is not fighting their jihad against them. The Muslim Brotherhood is entrenched in America to the point that they are influencing, if not actually writing our laws, in the process of bringing about what they call “political jihad.”

The immigration bill from the Gang of Eight is an example of Muslims effecting law in America. The National Review exposes their participation in an article dated May 5, 2013.

The current bill added the words “legal and advocacy” to this section. Thus, it now reads “nonprofit organizations including those with legal and advocacy experience working with immigrant communities.” Apparently the senators wanted to make sure that leftist and Islamist advocacy organizations (CASA, La Raza, MALDEF, and CAIR and other Islamist groups) would not simply be grant recipients themselves, but would also be entrenched on the “New Immigrant Councils” that will help guide strategy, funding, and implementation at the local level.

At CAIR’s website we see that:

CAIR’s government affairs department represents the interests of the American Muslim community before the U.S. Congress, the White House, and federal agencies. The department is responsible for actively monitoring legislation and government activities that affects Muslims and responding on behalf of the American Muslim community. To ensure that the Muslim community is being represented, we provide a Muslim perspective to policy makers and answer questions from government officials about issues related to Islam and Muslims. The department also promotes legislative action alerts, distributes legislative fact sheets, submits testimony to Congress and sponsors a number of activities designed to bring Muslim concerns to the government.

The department builds networks and coalitions that promote justice and mutual understanding to support domestic policies that promote civil rights, diversity and freedom of religion and oppose policies that limit civil rights, permit racial, ethnic or religious profiling, infringe on due process, or that prevent Muslims and others from participating fully in American civic life.
The department also works to increase Muslim participation in the political arena, and works with CAIR chapters regularly sponsor voter registration and get out the vote drives, candidate forums, and campaign volunteer opportunities across the country.

 

Russian troops in Syria could end up helping Isis, report claims.

The deployment of Russian troops in Syria could end up helping Islamic State as they have been sent to areas where they are most likely to fight other groups opposed to Isis, according to a new report.

The Royal United Services Institute (Rusi) report comes ahead of a US-Russian summit meeting at the UN on Monday, when Barack Obama will question Vladimir Putin on the intention behind Russia’s deepening military involvement in Syria, according to US officials.

The Iranian president, Hassan Rouhani – also in New York for the UN general assembly meeting – rejected suggestions that his country was operating in concert with Russia against Isis. “I do not see a coalition between Iran and Russia on fighting terrorism in Syria,” Rouhani said.

The Rusi report, titled Inherently Unresolved, assesses the global effort to counter the spread of Isis, and warns that Iraq and Syria may not survive as unitary states. It includes a section on Russian aims, particularly those underpinning Putin’s despatch this month of warplanes and troops to Tartus and Latakia in support of Bashar al-Assad’s regime.

Igor Sutyagin, a Russian strategic analyst, said there was an air regiment at Latakia with 28 planes, a battalion of motorised infantry and military engineers as well as a marine battalion at the naval base in Tartus.

The deployment, Sutyagin said, “underlines the contradictions of the Kremlin’s policy”, because the troops were in areas where Isis is not present.

“In this way, Russian troops are backing Assad in the fight against groups such as Jabhat al-Nusra and Ahrar al-Sham, which are themselves opposed to Isis. If Russian troops do eventually join combat, therefore, they would also – technically – be assisting Isis,” Sutyagin argued.

Satellite image from last week shows Russian aircraft and ground vehicles at air base in Latakia, Syria

The report says the Russian deployment should not therefore be seen as a change of policy towards fighting Isis directly, but a largely political move designed to save Assad and consolidate Russia’s hold over its naval base at Tartus and its newly built air base in Latakia, while currying favour with the west and the Gulf Arab states who are themselves reluctant to fight Isis on the ground.

“Indeed, the Kremlin may well be hoping that the west will show its appreciation by lifting the sanctions imposed in response to the situation in Ukraine,” Sutyagin said.

The tensions hanging over the Obama-Putin meeting on Monday were highlighted by discord between Washington and Moscow in describing the summit. US officials said it had been requested by Putin. A Russian spokesman insisted it was Obama who asked to meet. The White House said the meeting would address both the conflicts in Ukraine and Syria. The Kremlin said Ukraine would only be raised “if there was time”.

Celeste Wallander, the White House National Security Council’s senior director for Russia, said that Obama would press Putin on his objectives in Syria. Putin meanwhile told CBS News: “There is no other solution to the Syrian crisis than strengthening the effective government structures and rendering them help in fighting terrorism. But at the same time, urging them to engage in positive dialogue with the rational opposition and conduct reform.”

The White House argues that the Russian strategy of entrenching Assad will only serve to deepen the roots of extremism in Syria. Ben Rhodes, a White House spokesman, said that at the UN meeting “the president will have the opportunity to make clear to President Putin that we share the determination to counter Isil [Isis], that we welcome constructive contributions to counter Isil. But at the same time, we believe that one of the principal motivating factors for people who are fighting with Isil is the Assad regime.”

The Rusi report said that it would be “perfectly feasible” to defeat Isis if Turkey and Iran were also engaged in the search for a regional solution. It advised US policymakers to “not give up on the possibility of maintaining the unity of Iraq and Syria, but not be beholden or obsessed with this idea either”.

“If the US could ‘father’ two brand-new states in the Balkans during the 1990s, there is no reason why Washington should not tolerate at least the informal emergence of new states in the Middle East,” the report argued.

 

ISIS makes sure to avoid one apocalyptic prophecy about the Antichrist.

ISIS bases much of its recruitment and expansion strategy around the idea that the end times are upon us.

The extremist group pushes the idea that the apocalypse is nigh and that Islamic fighters will battle the “infidels” of the West in Dabiq, a town in Syria that ISIS now controls.

ISIS (also known as the Islamic State) uses Islamic scripture and prophecies to bolster its assertion, but it conveniently ignores one particularly damning prophecy that could inherently challenge the legitimacy of its self-declared “caliphate” — the territory in Iraq and Syria it controls that is central to Islamic doomsday prophecies.

Will McCants, director of the Project on US Relations with the Islamic World at the Brookings Institution, mentions it in his new book, “The ISIS Apocalypse.”

“There is one prophecy about the Antichrist that the Islamic State and its fans have studiously avoided, even though it is in a collection of prophecies they revere: The Antichrist will ‘appear in the empty area between Sham [Syria] and Iraq,'” McCants wrote. “That, of course, is precisely where the Islamic State is located.”

As McCants explained in his book, Jesus and the Antichrist do have a place in Islamic foretellings.

“The Qur’an portrays Jesus as a messenger of God and his followers as those ‘nearest in love to the believers’ (5:82),” McCants wrote. “But the prophecies attributed to Muhammad outside the Qur’an foresee Jesus returning to fight alongside the Muslims against the infidels. As in the Bible, the appearance of Jesus heralds the Last Days. …

“He will lead the Muslims in a war against the Jews, who will fight on behalf of the Antichrist.”

There are other Islamic prophecies that don’t jibe with ISIS’ message.

ISIS extremists often repeat ones that state the armies of “Rome” will come to northern Syria to fight Islamic soldiers.

“We should think of Rome as the Republic of Turkey — the same republic that ended the last self-identified caliphate, 90 years ago,” Graeme Wood wrote in The Atlantic earlier this year. “Other Islamic State sources suggest that Rome might mean any infidel army, and the Americans will do nicely.”

The “Rome” declaration doesn’t quite fit modern times if we’re to think of “Rome” as Turkey or the West.

“The fact that Turkish Muslims, not infidel Romans, control Constantinople, or Istanbul, today and are working with the infidel West against the Islamic State makes the Dabiq prophecy a poor fit for contemporary events,”  McCants wrote.

“… But in the apocalyptic imagination, inconvenient facts rarely impede the glorious march to the end of the world.”

Army Rejects Appeal of Green Beret Charles Martland Who Stood Up for 12 year old Afghan boy who was Raped.

Charles Martland acted Honorably and was treated like a criminal.

This is very disturbing that our country is so afraid that it sides with the enemy? Where is America going politically? When I read the story about our men and women in the Military being ordered to turn a blind eye to Child sex abuse and Rape I dismissed the thought, I even stated in a post if it were seen by one of our troops someone would end up dead. Now I run across this video. People Speak up! Post, call the Army, let us be a voice to bring the reckoning day to all these corrupt entities that are in our Government! This is Bull Shit. -Islamacide